I have been to... with specific time

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cfu507

Senior Member
Hebrew
Hi, Can I use "I have been to..." with a specific time? I think the answer is no, but not sure.

1. I have been to Tel Megiddo on February 22.
2. I visited/traveled/was in Tel Megiddo on February 22.

Which one is correct?
 
  • Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You could use have been if the specific time refers to a specific event. Assume that they have a Winter Carnival at Tel Megiddo on February 22nd. In that case #1 would be correct but only if the context is made clear. Eg., Question: "Were you in Tel Megiddo for the Winter Carnival?" Ans. "Yes, I have been to Tel Megiddo on February 22nd."
     

    latinquarternight

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    "I have been to.." with a specific time is not correct in English.

    The above suggestions are good, but I would normally say "I went to Tel Megiddo on February 22."
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Thanks, one more thing...

    Tel Meggido is a hill in these days. Megiddo was a city in the Bible period (Solomon and Ahab). It is not a city any more. Is it "in Tel Megiddo" or "at Tel Megiddo"?

    Edit: Harry Batt, in one sentence you used "at" and in another you used "in". Is there a reason?
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    Context: I'm sending pictures which I took when I was in/at Tel Megiddo. I added a link in post #7. Please see what this place is in these days. I want to write when I traveled there (as an indication for when I took those pictures). It was on February 22, 2008. How can I say it?


    PS. Guys, you are too fast for my typing :)
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    That depends. It's it inhabited? What sentence do you want to say?

    I live on Tel Meggido
    I live on Tel Meggido Mountain??
    Hi, Tel is a Hebrew word for an archeological hill of a destroyed old place/city. I should have say it before. Here, Tel is not exactly part of the city's name (It's not like in the name of "Tel-Aviv"). Sorry for not saying it before.
     

    Harry Batt

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Edit: Harry Batt, in one sentence you used "at" and in another you used "in". Is there a reason?
    Just a matter of taste. The general rule would be: Use at a small locality and in if it is large; eg. at Tel, in Tel Aviv.
     

    nzfauna

    Senior Member
    New Zealand, English
    It looks like an uninhabited archeological/historical site, therefore I would say:

    I took these pictures at Tel Meggido on 22 February.

    However, if it were inhabited, i.e. a town, I would say "I took these pictures in Tel Meggido on 22 February".
     

    cfu507

    Senior Member
    Hebrew
    The date is not so important. It just that I sent some other pictures of some other places I went in February.

    Thank you both.
     
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