I <have informed>

Phoebe1200

Senior Member
Russian-Russia
NCIS
Before sending the team out, the Operation's manager says:



I have informed Stone's supervisor that you'll be paying him a visit at the Naval Lab.


1) What is the reason for present perfect?
2) Can it be used with past simple as well "I informed...."?



With much appreciation!
 
  • kuterfazer

    Member
    Polish
    Yes, you can say so, at least I think so because you did not give a time when you informed someone. But if your sentence looks like this one I have informed stone's supervisor yesterday... it would be incorrect, and in this sentence you should use informed without have.

    And the reason why we have have informed here is because something happened a while before we informed someone
     

    Oddmania

    Senior Member
    French
    He or she used the present perfect because the piece of information is still relevant in their mind. "You will be paying him a visit". It hasn't happened yet.

    I have made a cake for Betty's birthday. I hope it's good!
    I made a cake for Betty's birthday. Unsurprisingly, it was awful because I'm terrible at baking. It really ruined the dinner.
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    He or she used the present perfect because the piece of information is still relevant in their mind. "You will be paying him a visit". It hasn't happened yet.
    I understand. But still, could it also have been said with past simple in the OP?
     

    Phoebe1200

    Senior Member
    Russian-Russia
    I was only thinking about using past simple because the action of informing is already over, completed, I mean, the manager picked up the phone and informed the person, even though it might have happened minutes ago.

    What do you think?
     

    Glenfarclas

    Senior Member
    English (American)
    I was only thinking about using past simple because the action of informing is already over, completed, I mean, the manager picked up the phone and informed the person, even though it might have happened minutes ago.

    What do you think?
    It's more natural with the present perfect, although it wouldn't be wrong with the simple past.
     

    Enquiring Mind

    Senior Member
    English - the Queen's
    Hi Phoebe, I agree with Glenfarclas above. The present perfect is the natural choice of tense here.

    "The present perfect tense is difficult for Russians. We mix it up with the simple past tense. The main difference between these tenses is that the present perfect expresses an action that comes up to the present moment and always has a connection with the present moment, while the simple past expresses a completed past action that started and ended in the past and has no connection with the present moment." (Source: usefulenglish.ru, 3/4 of the way down the linked page; my underlining here)

    Although, as you say, the action of informing the supervisor is already over, as Oddmania pointed out in #3, there is a reference to (or connection with) the present in your context. Why does the Operations Manager tell them he spoke to the Stone's supervisor? Because it's relevant to what they are doing now. They are now - at the present moment (of speaking) - in a briefing in which the information is relevant. They are about to visit Stone at the Lab, and his supervisor knows about it at the time of speaking.
     
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