I have met the cleaner for the last three months.

wolfbm1

Senior Member
Polish
Hello.
A cleaner comes to clean the aquarium every second Friday. I wonder if I could use the following perfect tenses to express that:

1. I have been meeting the cleaner every second Friday for the last three months.
2. I have met the cleaner every second Friday for the last three months.
3. I have met the cleaner for the last three months.


I don't think I can say sentence #3, because it doesn't say how often it happens. Am I right?

Thank you.
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    Is there any particular reason to say "I met the cleaner"? That doesn't imply that he has been cleaning your aquarium, only that you've been meeting him.

    A cleaner has been coming to clean my aquarium every second Friday for the last three months.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    Whenever I meet the aquarium (or fish tank) cleaner I always have a little chat with him. He always encourages me to buy an aquarium, and says that it is not difficult to maintain it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I'd like to simplify things:

    1 I have been meeting Fred (regularly) for the last three months.
    2 I have met Fred regularly for the last three months.
    3 I have met Fred for the last three months. -
    I would imagine you meant #1 or #2, but it isn't good. Use the other versions. In #1, the time expression is optional.
     

    Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    I'm not sure I've understood. In your OP you said the cleaner comes to clean the aquarium. In post #3, you say he always encourages you to buy an aquarium which implies you don't have one.

    In any case, what is it that you want to refer to? The cleaning of the aquarium, or your meeting with him?
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    No, I haven't got an aquarium. I just wonder if I can say how long I see or meet a person using the present perfect simple.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you continue meeting with the person you would say 'I've been meeting him every week for the past three months'. You could also use the simple present which more strongly suggests a habit that's going to continue.
    But 'meet' isn't the right word. You can use 'see' (I see the cleaner every week), or 'come' (The cleaner comes every week).
    One reason for not using 'meet', is that he comes to wherever you are for a particular purpose, which is not to talk to you.
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    I'd like to simplify things:

    1 I have been meeting Fred (regularly) for the last three months.
    2 I have met Fred regularly for the last three months.
    3 I have met Fred for the last three months. -
    I would imagine you meant #1 or #2, but it isn't good. Use the other versions. In #1, the time expression is optional.
    If I dropped the expressin "the last" in #3, could the new sentence mean that the action of meeting Fred has taken three months so far?
     

    wolfbm1

    Senior Member
    Polish
    If you continue meeting with the person you would say 'I've been meeting him every week for the past three months'. You could also use the simple present which more strongly suggests a habit that's going to continue.
    But 'meet' isn't the right word. You can use 'see' (I see the cleaner every week), or 'come' (The cleaner comes every week).
    One reason for not using 'meet', is that he comes to wherever you are for a particular purpose, which is not to talk to you.
    Thank you, Hermione Golightly. :) I asked the question because I'm studying differences between the present perfect simple and the present perfect continuous. The present simple is also of interst for me.
    So, both the present simple and the present perfect continuous can be used if I continue meeting with Fred, the tank cleaner.
    I see Fred twice a month, every second Friday.
    I've been seeing Fred twice a month, every second Friday.
    I've seen Fred regularly for the last three months.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If I dropped the expression "the last" in #3, could the new sentence mean that the action of meeting Fred has taken three months so far?
    \


    I have met Fred for three months - would simply puzzle me. I would wonder what it meant.
    Probably I'd think it meant "I have been meeting Fred for three months".
     
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