I have my breakfast,lunch, dinner?

Hese

Senior Member
German
Hello there,

I've been wondering for a while whether it is possible to use the possessive "my" in the expression "I have my breakfast".

I often hear it, but most of the time the speakers are non-natives.

Thank you very much for your help!
 
  • Wishfull

    Banned
    Japanese
    Hi.
    I don't know the meaning of "I have my breakfast."
    Does it mean; "I eat my breakfast everyday"?
    Or "my breakfast has been ready to eat"?


    I can understand;
    "I ate my breakfast."
    "I had my breakfast."

    Sorry my poor understanding.
     

    Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Esneider, please provide context. Neither "I have lunch." or "I have my lunch." are complete sentences. The following are complete sentences:

    "I have lunch at 12:00":tick:
    "I have my lunch at 12:00":tick:
    "I don't eat lunch until 12:00":tick:
    "I don't eat my lunch until 12:00":tick:
    "I have lunch with my boss every Friday":tick:
    "I have my lunch with my girlfriends every Friday":cross: (This is not technically wrong, it's just not idiomatic).
    "I have lunch with my girlfriends every Friday":tick:

    I'm sure that there are many other contexts.
     

    temblor

    Senior Member
    WU CHINESE
    Esneider, please provide context. Neither "I have lunch." or "I have my lunch." are complete sentences. The following are complete sentences:

    "I have lunch at 12:00":tick:
    "I have my lunch at 12:00":tick:
    "I don't eat lunch until 12:00":tick:
    "I don't eat my lunch until 12:00":tick:
    "I have lunch with my boss every Friday":tick:
    "I have my lunch with my girlfriends every Friday":cross: (This is not technically wrong, it's just not idiomatic).
    "I have lunch with my girlfriends every Friday":tick:

    I'm sure that there are many other contexts.

    "I have my lunch with my girlfriends every Friday". I can't find anything wrong with it.
    Is "I have my lunch with my girlfriends Fridays" right?
     
    In BrE, we usually omit "my".

    I had lunch at 1 o'clock

    I'm having lunch with my boss today (= I will have ....)

    But you would use "my" if you were describing a particualr arrangement for you on your own, such as:

    Rather than stay in the office at lunchtime, I took my lunch to the park and ate it there.
     

    Rational_gaze

    Senior Member
    British English
    It usually depends on if you're saying 'lunch' to mean the event, or lunch to mean the actual food.

    "I'm having lunch today with some friends" refers to the event of having lunch, although it wouldn't be technically incorrect to say 'my lunch'.

    "I have packed my lunch for today" refers to the food, although again, you might hear it without the 'my' occasionally.

    This is why "I have my lunch with my girlfriends every Friday" sounds a little odd.


    Edit: Oops sorry, it seems I've basically just repeated everyone else. I guess I didn't read properly.
     
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