I have reserved a table for two

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quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
I have reserved a table for two at a fancy restaurant next Sunday.
I have made a reservation for two at a high-class restaurant next Sunday.




Do both of the above two versions sound equally right and convey the same idea? Thanks.
 
  • AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I have reserved a table for two at a fancy restaurant for next Sunday.
    I have made a reservation for two at a high-class restaurant for next Sunday.

    Do both of the above two versions sound equally right and convey the same idea? Thanks.
    Hi QD,

    Yes, they mean the same thing, but you have to add the word, for - meaning: taking place next Sunday.

    AngelEyes
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I agree that they are interchangeable in everyday conversation. I'd just like to add that it is possible at some restaurants to reserve a particular table rather than just make a reservation for two where you might be seated anywhere. Usually I hear this expressed as "I have reserved my favorite table for two at (name of restuarant) for next Sunday", but "I have reserved a table for two" could carry this connotation in certain settings, while "I have made a reservation for two" could not.

    I hope I'm not splitting hairs.
     

    AngelEyes

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    I actually did that last week, James, except I got even more specific.

    I called and said, "I'd like to reserve table 13." So in my mind, QD's examples are equal and this example raises it another notch.

    I guess I'd never think of it like you did because I get so specific under certain circumstances and with certain restaurants. :)


    AngelEyes
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    I have reserved a table for two at a fancy restaurant next Sunday.
    I have made a reservation for two at a high-class restaurant next Sunday.




    Do both of the above two versions sound equally right and convey the same idea? Thanks.
    Yes, they do.

    May I just add that in BE you would probably be more likely to hear "posh" than "fancy" or "high-class".
     
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