I have sailed on.. (travel by ship)

< Previous | Next >

word_up

Senior Member
Hello,

What is the proper phrase to say that someone has traveled on a sailing ship / steamer / other boat?
Is the example beneath idiomatic?

"I have sailed on USS Constitution 3 times. The last time we went to Argentina."

Is "on" necessary?

How to express that same idea in case of other ships?

I .... on Titanic (sic!). Few of us survived. (is traveled the only choice?)

A sailing ship sails to a port. What does a steamship do? Goes?

Thanks
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    Your first example is correct.

    What are some of the ways to describe maritime travel?

    1. Sailed on
    2. Traveled by boat to (destination)
    3. Went by sea to (destination)
    4. Took the (Name of ship) to the Peanut Islands

    There are many others. Which fits best will depend on context and style.
     

    word_up

    Senior Member
    Thanks for these examples, Cuchuflete.

    And sticking with "sailed (other verb) on (name of a ship)", what if the vessel type changes?

    I wondered if this would be correct, or do I need some other verb here?

    I traveled on Titanic. (you cannot say "sailed on Titanic" for obvious reasons - there were no sails ;). What's a good verb here, with the rest of the sentence intact?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    If you were in the Royal Navy you would sail, or serve, in HMS Ark Royal. I suspect that might also be true of the US Navy, but you would need an American who knows about such things to confirm that.
     

    word_up

    Senior Member
    Ok, great!

    So you can say
    I sailed in this steamship. We went from America to Europe.

    But what about the use of "on" instead of "in" - do I understand it right, that you disagree with my first example of USS Constitution (and with Cuchuflete at the same time) where "on" was used?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Ok, great!

    So you can say
    I sailed in this steamship. We went from America to Europe.

    But what about the use of "on" instead of "in" - do I understand it right, that you disagree with my first example of USS Constitution (and with Cuchuflete at the same time) where "on" was used?

    I would use "on". A steam ship offers up another opton: "steamed"

    We steamed from America to Europe on the RMS Mauretania.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    But what about the use of "on" instead of "in" - do I understand it right, that you disagree with my first example of USS Constitution (and with Cuchuflete at the same time) where "on" was used?
    No, I wasn't disagreeing - I just pointed out the specific use in the Royal Navy of being in a ship, not on it. I suggested that this might also be the case in the US Navy, but you would need the advice of somebody who knows the custom of that Navy to know if you sail in or on the USS Constitution.

    I think that most people would say that they sailed on a ship "I took a cruise on the Oriana". I could use either in or on without thinking about it because I have spent part of my working life in fairly close contact with naval officers.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I hear mostly "on" in the USA. Indeed we fly "on" Boeing 737 aircraft, despite the fact that we spend the entire flight inside the plane.

    On a ship you can spend part of the time in your stateroom and part of the time on the deck, so it is split. But the aircraft require that we spend the entire time inside (unless you are a wing walker). And yet we usually say I flew on a ______________ [aircraft]; and sailed on a ___________[ship].
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top