I have studied & I had studied

Zaeem

Member
Saudi Arabia, Arabic
Hi

What the difference between these sentences? When should I use them?

--“I have studied English in the U.S.”
--“I had studied English in the U.S.”


Thanks in advance
 
  • nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Zaeem said:
    Hi

    What the difference between these sentences? When should I use them?

    --“I have studied English in the U.S.”
    --“I had studied English in the U.S.”


    Thanks in advance


    The first one means you are still studying it in USA now, and the second one means you used to study it in USA but not anymore.
     

    Le Pamplemousse

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I would like to add that you probably wouldn't hear the second one unless there was a past event to link it with. Since it's the past perfect tense, it comes before an event in the past. For instance:

    "I had studied English in the U.S. before I moved back to Norway."

    Without such an event, perhaps there is an implied event, such as:

    "I had studied English in the U.S. (before I stopped)."

    Cheers.
     
    Zaeem said:
    Hi

    What the difference between these sentences? When should I use them?

    --“I have studied English in the U.S.”
    --“I had studied English in the U.S.”


    Thanks in advance

    Hi Zaeem,

    Welcome to Word Reference Forums.:)

    Examples:

    Question - 'What experience do you have of foreign languages?'

    Answer - 'I have studied English in the U.S.'

    Question - 'Any other experience?'

    Answer - 'After I had studied English in the U.S., I went to Paris to study French.

    I'm a bit rusty on my memory of grammar but I think the first example is in the perfect tense. The second is the past historic.

    LRV
     

    Le Pamplemousse

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Answer - 'After I had studied English in the U.S., I went to Paris to study French.

    I'm a bit rusty on my memory of grammar but I think the first example is in the perfect tense. The second is the past historic.

    "Had studied" is definitely an example of past perfect. You wouldn't have to use it historically. For instance:

    "Yesterday, since I had already taken a shower, my friends came over."

    I don't believe English has a past historic tense.
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    la reine victoria said:
    Sorry to disagree Nichec.
    la reine victoria said:

    I have studied isn't the same as I am studying. Past and present tense difference.


    LRV


    Yes, my queen, I realize that after I posted it....it should be "I have been studying English in USA"
     

    Kräuter_Fee

    Senior Member
    Portuguese & Spanish
    By the way I have a question...
    I used to visit a forum where there was a woman from Hawaii... she used the past perfect just like other English-speakers use past simple. For example she'd say "I had eaten a sandwich today" instead of "I ate a sandwich today"... is that the way they talk in Hawaii???
     

    Le Pamplemousse

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Sorry to disagree Nichec.

    I have studied isn't the same as I am studying. Past and present tense difference.

    Agreed. If you were to say "I have been studying English in the U.S. (for 5 years)." It would imply that you are still doing it at the present time. This is an example of the present perfect progressive.
     

    Le Pamplemousse

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Well, I just addressed "have been" in my previous post. You might use "had been" like this:

    "I had been studying English in the U.S. when I was offered a job in Mexico."
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Oh, I know, I know....I made a silly mistake and I've already corrected it in my second post, would you please forgive me, dear Sirs and My Queen?:D
     

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Well, OK

    The Present Perfect Tense: you still study...
    The Past Perfect: You once studied, but you don’t do it any more...

    but there’s a question why to use The Past Perfect when you could simply use the Past Tense:

    I studied English in the USA.

    Magixo
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    Le Pamplemousse said:
    As we have said numerous times in this very thread, Magixo, present perfect doesn't imply that you still do the action.

    When the present perfect is used with for <a period of time> or since <a point in time> it does imply that the action is still taking place.

    Rita has been a journalist with The Daily Profit for 3 months.
    (and she still is a journalist)

    Hermione has loved Slabbers since she first met him.
    (and she is still loves him)
     

    Magixo

    Senior Member
    Croatian
    Well, I don’t know, but It has to do something with the Present since it’s the Present Perfect Tense.

    The question is why to use the Past Perfect Tense to express a simple past action when you could simply use the Past Tense:

    I studied English in the USA.

    Magixo
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    The simple past (preterite) is used for an action completed in the past.
    Yesterday I went to the cinema.

    The present perfect is used for an action begun in the past, but which still has an effect in the present.
    I have gone to the pub every Friday for the last 10 years (and probably will continue to do so)
    I went to the pub every Friday for 10 years, then I bought a home-brew kit, and now I get pickled at home..

    Have you done your homework?
    (implication: It is still possible to finish doing it)
    Did you do your homework? [last night or someother time in the past]
    (implication: It is no longer possible to finish it)

    If there is a word in the sentence which defines a time in the past, you cannot use present perfect.
    [This is different from languages such as French or German]
     

    C. E. Whitehead

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    Yes, the present in English (I work, I live at . . . ) is used for:
    habitual action;
    a state of fact.

    the present continuous in English (I am working) is used for:
    action you are in the process of doing (or sometimes, about to do,
    as in
    "I am going to the store [in a minute]."

    the present pefect in English (I have taught English) is used for:
    action you have completed as of this moment.
    It could be completed at some time in the past; here
    you use 'have' to mean the action is in your repertoire, you own it in some sense! (I'm not sure all languages think in these terms!)
    (But 'have you done your homework' does not mean that you can still do your homework; it means more or less, 'have you got it with you?')

    the simple past is used in English (I worked yesterday) for:
    action completed at some time in the past; you often specify the time, 'yesterday' for example.

    the past perfect is used in English (I had already arrived when he entered) to describe action completed at some time in the past--often when referring to another simple past event.

    We also have the imperfect.

    I need someone to help me translate the English perfect tense into French.

    I am thinking I might use the present tense or the passe compose:

    Les breuvages gazeuses et sucrés, le "Coca&nbsp;cola", par exemple,
    atteignent/ont atteint une popularité globale.


    Which is better?
     

    Kelly B

    Curmodgeratrice
    USA English
    C. E. Whitehead said:
    I need someone to help me translate the English perfect tense into French.

    I am thinking I might use the present tense or the passe compose:

    Les breuvages gazeuses et sucrés, le "Coca&nbsp;cola", par exemple,
    atteignent/ont atteint une popularité globale.

    Which is better?
    Hello, C.E. Whitehead,
    You should start a new thread in the French-English forum for this question. Thanks.
     
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