I have the experience of living in Canada for 5 years.

alohafromjapan

Senior Member
Japanese
I have one more question.

1.I have the experience of living in Canada for 5 years.
2.I have the experience of having lived in Canada for 5 years.

Which of the two sentences fits the content of "I lived in Canada for 5 years(implying the experience and the duration)"?
 
  • Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I think the first one is acceptable, but I would prefer "I have experienced living in Canada..." rather than "I have the experience of living in Canada..." or simply "I have lived in Canada".

    I would reject the second one, mainly because the double use of have is clumsy and unnecessary.

    If appropriate, I think it would better to make it explicit whether the speaker is still living in Canada or not.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I have one more question.

    1.I have the experience of living in Canada for 5 years.
    2.I have the experience of having lived in Canada for 5 years.

    Which of the two sentences fits the content of "I lived in Canada for 5 years(implying the experience and the duration)"?
    I am still puzzled by the distinction you are trying to make. The only way you can live somewhere for a specific duration and not have the "experience" of it is to be unconscious or in a coma for that duration.:(

    I wonder if you possibly mean, for example, "My English language skills benefit from five years of experience living in an English-speaking country"?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I like Julian's suggestion.
    Aloha, both your sentences are rather self defeating (if inserted in a resume, for example). If you wish to recommend yourself and your learning, you need to use more graceful, non-foreign-sounding constructions (which may be grammatical, but sound odd).
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I agree with JulianStuart. Why do you want to make the sentence longer and more complex? "I lived in Canada for five years" is perfect. It doesn't simply "imply" the experience and duration; it states the fact clearly and simply.
     

    elwynt

    Member
    English (London, England)
    Just to point out a typo in your post #6, Bennymix. This is just in case learners try to find 'environoments' in a dictionary! :)
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    "Having lived in Canada, I am experienced" makes sense, but to me, "having lived" is not an experience: "living" is. And "having lived" is not "experience" (non-count) either:

    I have experience living in Canada.:tick:
    I have experience having lived in Canada.:cross:
     

    elwynt

    Member
    English (London, England)
    "Having lived in Canada, I am experienced" makes sense, but to me, "having lived" is not an experience: "living" is. And "having lived" is not "experience" (non-count) either:

    I have experience living in Canada.:tick:
    I have experience having lived in Canada.:cross:
    I don't recognise the first (ticked) sentence as normal English. Did you mean to write 'experienced' - or have I missed the point somehow?
     

    Forero

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I don't recognise the first (ticked) sentence as normal English. Did you mean to write 'experienced' - or have I missed the point somehow?
    Interesting, Elwynt. And welcome to the forum.

    I meant what I said, and I am surprised you don't recognize it as normal English. I wonder what others think. It is not uncommon to find, for example, a divide between BrE and AmE, or even between Arkansas English and Kansas English.
     

    alohafromjapan

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thank you all for the detailed explanations:)

    English is my second language so I don't quite understand some of them.
    However,I realized that duration is not always experience in English.
    This may be a gap between English and Japanese.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    I find the ticked sentence acceptable. Having been in the US for so long, I cannot tell whether this is a BrE /AmE thing.

    I have experience teaching chemistry. (I known how to do it). This means that I have done it and gained from the experience so I will be able to do it again more easily than if I had never taught. This is the sort of thing you might include on a c.v.

    I have experience living in Canada. (I know how to do it) It's very cold in winter there and you need to know how to deal with the cold and snow and ensure your house and car function properly. It was a learning experience. I even survived the blizzard of '79 that shut down Buffalo and my 1964 Plymouth Valiant started after being out overnight at -20°C.

    I have experienced living in Canada. (I have undergone the experience) I had to spend a year there but I didn't like it because it was too cold.

    We still need aloha to indicate what sense was intended by the original sentences and in what context this "experience" might be of interest to a reader.

    Edit: Crossposted with #11
     

    alohafromjapan

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks again!Mr.JulianStuart!

    (I am an American.I was born and raised in the U.S.Now I live in the U.S.),but

    "I have experience living in Japan for more than 10 years(I have the experience of living in Japan for more than 10 years)"
    so I don't have any discomforts with daily conversations in Japanese.

    How about this?

     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Your insistence on using "experience" continues to cause problems with your efforts, making them unnatural.

    Is there some reason you're insisting upon this problematic approach?
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    "I have experience living in Japan for more than 10 years(I have the experience of living in Japan for more than 10 years)

    Can you explain, using other words, what difference in meaning you understand between
    1) I have experience living in Japan for more than 10 years
    and
    2) I have lived in Japan for more than 10 years.

    In English we consider "living" to be an "experience", so we are confused by your usage.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Thanks again!Mr.JulianStuart!

    (I am an American.I was born and raised in the U.S.Now I live in the U.S.),but

    "I have experience living in Japan for more than 10 years(I have the experience of living in Japan for more than 10 years)"
    so I don't have any discomforts with daily conversations in Japanese.

    How about this?

    Thanks,Mr.SD and JS!

    1) I don't live in Japan any longer.
    2) I'm still living in Japan now.

    I take them that way.
    Then the way you say this in English is as follows:
    1) I have experience living lived in Japan for more than 10 years
    and
    2) I have lived in Japan for more than 10 years.
    Do not use "have the experience of" when all you mean is "I lived there" or "I have lived there".

    If, for example, you mean to say that "I gained experience in speaking (conversational) Japanese because I lived there for ten years" you need to express it specifically. That is an exampe of what we mean by "context or background" - i..e the situation in which you use the sentences you ask about.
     

    elwynt

    Member
    English (London, England)
    Interesting, Elwynt. And welcome to the forum.

    I meant what I said, and I am surprised you don't recognize it as normal English. I wonder what others think. It is not uncommon to find, for example, a divide between BrE and AmE, or even between Arkansas English and Kansas English.
    I, too, find it interesting. I hope other BE speakers will either agree or disagree with me on this - perhaps I'm an outlier! I personally would say "I have experience of teaching", but I would not say "I have experience of living in Canada" - and this for the reasons given by other posters (living is the experience). If I said "I have experienced teaching" (as I well might), then I would probably be about to tell you what a ghastly experience it was. If the experience had been pleasant or even just neutral I would say "I have been a teacher" or "I taught for a number of years". Perhaps this is very British? Or just me?
    By the way, thank you for the welcome to the Forum. In fact I have been a member for thousands of posts but on changing my email address I have become a newcomer, despite asking a moderator for help in changing this. No matter, I love the Forum. :)
     
    Last edited:

    alohafromjapan

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks again!Mr.JulianStuart and elwynt!

    1) I lived in Japan for more than 10 years.

    In conclusion,the sentence above contains both experience and duration the most?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Experience" doesn't mean what you think it means. Your sentences with "experience" you imply that you have also gained some sort of skill. Not only have I lived there, but I can explain the tax and public transportation systems to you.
    I taught English. I was the teacher of a class.
    I have experience teaching English. I have gained skills that allow me to teach English well.
     

    alohafromjapan

    Senior Member
    Japanese
    Thanks,Myridon!

    We sometimes tell someone "Duration" as "Experience" in Japanese.
    I feel that this might be a gap between English and Japanese.
     
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