I have the pleasure to send you a proposal

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Webnet

New Member
Italy italian
Hi

is it more correct to write:

I have the pleasure to send you a proposal

or I have the pleasure in sending you a proposal?

Thanks

 
  • ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Hi Webnet, welcome to the English Only forum.

    If you must use an expression like this, the correct form is
    I have pleasure in sending you a proposal or
    I have the pleasure of sending you a proposal.

    HOWEVER, I used to teach Business English and always recommended to my students that they try to avoid 'flowery' expressions of this type. They were once common in business correspondence but nowadays often sound a bit insincere, and (in the UK at least, in my experience) readers will say to themselves "Yes, yes, never mind all that, just get to the point".
    If I were writing your letter, I would simply say I am sending you a proposal.
    Other posters will no doubt disagree with me, but that's the nature of the forum!
    ~ewie
     

    Elwintee

    Senior Member
    England English
    Hi Webnet, welcome to the English Only forum.

    If you must use an expression like this, the correct form is
    I have pleasure in sending you a proposal or
    I have the pleasure of sending you a proposal.

    HOWEVER, I used to teach Business English and always recommended to my students that they try to avoid 'flowery' expressions of this type. They were once common in business correspondence but nowadays often sound a bit insincere, and (in the UK at least, in my experience) readers will say to themselves "Yes, yes, never mind all that, just get to the point".
    If I were writing your letter, I would simply say I am sending you a proposal.
    Other posters will no doubt disagree with me, but that's the nature of the forum!
    ~ewie
    Hear, hear, Ewie! I think many 'Business English' instruction books are hopelessly out of date and positively misleading for learners nowadays.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    Hi Webnet, welcome to the English Only forum.

    If you must use an expression like this, the correct form is
    I have pleasure in sending you a proposal or
    I have the pleasure of sending you a proposal.

    HOWEVER, I used to teach Business English and always recommended to my students that they try to avoid 'flowery' expressions of this type. They were once common in business correspondence but nowadays often sound a bit insincere, and (in the UK at least, in my experience) readers will say to themselves "Yes, yes, never mind all that, just get to the point".
    If I were writing your letter, I would simply say I am sending you a proposal.
    Other posters will no doubt disagree with me, but that's the nature of the forum!
    ~ewie
    Good for you, ewie:thumbsup:

    My observation is that here in the U.S., we are even less likely to use that flowery language than in the U.K.

    It also seems to me that in other cultures and languages, such wasted verbiage continues to be used and thus tends to creep into translations.
     

    ewie

    Senior Member
    English English
    Good for you, ewie:thumbsup:

    My observation is that here in the U.S., we are even less likely to use that flowery language than in the U.K.
    I'm very pleased to hear that, SD.

    It also seems to me that in other cultures and languages, such wasted verbiage continues to be used and thus tends to creep into translations.
    You should see some of the unbelievable stuff they use in French.
    Je vous prie d'agréer, chers Messieurs, l'expression de mes sentiments les plus distingués = Yours sincerely

    Come think of it, even Yours sincerely sounds insincere nowadays!
     
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