I have you returning the car

Effortlessness

Member
Kurdish Kurdistan
Hi all
Context: Top Notch 2
Conversation:
Agent: I have you returning the car on August 14th here at the airport.
Renter: Yes. That's corrrect.

I am puzzled by this sentence in a conversation between a rental car agent and renter. We use simple form of the verb after have when it is used in causative sentences ,but here we have ing form of the verb. Do we have such a structure in English? Is it a grammatically correct sentence?
 
  • Vronsky

    Senior Member
    Russian - Russia
    You have me puzzling about it. Let's see what the natives have to say.
     
    Last edited:

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It means According to my records, you are returning the car on August 14.

    It could also be written as I have you down (I see in my notes that it is written down) as returning the car on August 14.

    Another example: Two police officers are investigating the movements of a suspect.
    "If you look at the CCTV tapes, we have him approaching the bank at 10 pm."
    This simply means that you can see him approaching the bank.
     
    Last edited:

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    This is a good example of how the continuous form of the verb works:

    This is the same as:
    I saw you riding the horse = I saw you in the process of riding the horse

    Agent: I have (am in possession of records of) you being in the process of returning(participle) the car on August 14th here at the airport.
     

    Effortlessness

    Member
    Kurdish Kurdistan
    It means According to my records, you are returning the car on August 14.

    It could also be written as I have you down (I see in my notes that it is written down) as returning the car on August 14.

    Another example: Two police officers are investigating the movements of a suspect.
    "If you look at the CCTV tapes, we have him approaching the bank at 10 pm."
    This simply means that you can see him approaching the bank.
    Thanks for your reply.
    I know the meaning. The structure is so cofusing. Could you explain more on the structure? Is it a causative sentence or what?
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It is not causative. I have you + participle = I have a record of you <participle>/I have you down as <participle>.

    You phone the dentist to check the time of your appointment.
    Receptionist: "I have you (down as) booked for Tuesday afternoon."
     
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    Effortlessness

    Member
    Kurdish Kurdistan
    It is not causative. I have you + participle = I have a record of you <participle>/I have you down as <participle>.

    You phone the dentist to check the time of your appointment.
    Receptionit: "I have you (down as) booked for Tuesday afternoon."
    Thanks a lot. I got it now.
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    Could you explain more on the structure?
    I.........have...you.....{returning...the car................................on August 14th......here at the airport.}
    Subject verb..object....{participle.....noun (as object of returning) ......adverbial...............adverbial.........}
    ................................{.......adverbial phrase, headed by a participle, which is modifying "have" .............}
     
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