I haven't understood

lovelearning

Member
Algeria Arabic
Please explain to me the meaning of:

Francis Scott Key's star-spangled banner with its awkward prosody and melisla-clogged penultimate line.

Thanks a lot
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    lovelearning said:
    Please explain to me the meaning of:

    Francis Scott Key's star-spangled banner with its awkward prosody and melisla-clogged penultimate line.

    Thanks a lot
    Greetings Lovelearning,

    I'll do what I can, but please remember that context is essential, whether for translation or for explaning something in its original language.

    Francis Scott Key is the lyricist/author of a song, The Star-spangled Banner.
    This song was written as he observed the British Navy shelling a fort in Baltimore harbor, one night during the war of 1812. The next morning, to his amazement, the fort was still there, as was the flag....the banner in question. The verse is atrocious, in my opinion, and the melody makes it very difficult for anyone to sing. It requires a vocal range of at least three octaves.

    The 'awkward prosody' refers to the lyric, with many forced rhymes.
    As to 'melisla-clogged penultimate line.', I've no idea. I've never seen the word 'melisla' before....The nearest I can find is in the Oxford English Dictionary: Melisma: A song, air, or melody, as opposed to recitative or declamatory music. The penultimate, as you know, is the next to the last.

    If you want further explanation, I suggest you provide some additional context, together with the last few lines of the lyrics. I'm sure you can find them with Google.

    regards,
    Cuchufléte
     

    lovelearning

    Member
    Algeria Arabic
    Thank you cuchuflète,of course any translation depends on the context and a translator must have a big cultural background in order to seize the meaning, which is not my case, especially when the idea is sarcastic like in this text.

    it's an article in the daily telegraph of today "opinion", the othor says:

    musically speaking, I'm not really a big fan of Francis Scott key's star-spangled banner with it's awkward prosody and melisma-clogged penultimate line- but the lyric does contain one big idea-that a land of the free has to be also, at some level, a home of the brave.

    Thank you
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    lovelearning said:
    Thank you cuchuflète,of course any translation depends on the context and a translator must have a big cultural background in order to seize the meaning, which is not my case, especially when the idea is sarcastic like in this text.

    it's an article in the daily telegraph of today "opinion", the othor says:

    musically speaking, I'm not really a big fan of Francis Scott key's star-spangled banner with it's awkward prosody and melisma-clogged penultimate line- but the lyric does contain one big idea-that a land of the free has to be also, at some level, a home of the brave.

    Thank you
    Thanks for the note and the added context, Lovelearning. I'm still stumped [colloquial for 'bewildered'] by Melisma]. I believe that the author [note, it's not 'othor' but author] shares my low opinion of the music, while he finds the idea of associating freedom and bravery compelling.

    Cuchu
     

    Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    lovelearning said:
    Please explain to me the meaning of:

    Francis Scott Key's star-spangled banner with its awkward prosody and melisla-clogged penultimate line.

    Thanks a lot
    Musically speaking, a melisma is a passage of several notes sung to one syllable: "that", "-ner" and "yet" are the words refered to in the next-to-last line. I don't think that really qualifies as melisma, a term more aptly applied to Gregorian Chant.

    Next: F. Scott Key wrote only the poem (in 1814). The tune has its first appearance in 1775 to accompany a text called "To Anacreon in Heaven", a song for the Anacreontic Society in London, a group of wealthy men and musicians me met informally. (Source: The Hymnal Companion)
     
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