I heard the sentence from teenager and will hear it until

jjshin

Senior Member
korean
I heard the sentnece from teen gager and will hear it unitl dying.

I heard the sentnece from teen gager and will hear unitl dying

Can I omit 'it'?
becasue it refers 'the sentence' .
I think it is redundancy.

Have a great day~
 
  • Rational_gaze

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi jjshin,

    You can't omit the 'it', or your sentence basically means that you won't go deaf before you die (i.e. you will be able to hear as normal).
     

    jjshin

    Senior Member
    korean
    Hi jjshin,

    You can't omit the 'it', or your sentence basically means that you won't go deaf before you die (i.e. you will be able to hear as normal).

    I am so sorry there is a typo.

    I heard this sentence form my teenager and will here it unitil I die.

    do you think a right above sentence is better?
     

    Rational_gaze

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm not completely sure I understand what you're asking...

    If you write "I heard this sentence from my teenager, and will hear it until I die." then it means that you will hear that sentence echoing around in your head until the day you die.

    If you write "I heard this sentence from my teenager, and will hear until I die." then it means that you heard something from your teenager, and you will be able to hear in general (the birds singing, your noisy neighbours, etc.) until you die.

    The 'it' is definitely necessary.

    Is that what you mean?
     

    jjshin

    Senior Member
    korean
    I'm not completely sure I understand what you're asking...

    If you write "I heard this sentence from my teenager, and will hear it until I die." then it means that you will hear that sentence echoing around in your head until the day you die.

    If you write "I heard this sentence from my teenager, and will hear until I die." then it means that you heard something from your teenager, and you will be able to hear in general (the birds singing, your noisy neighbours, etc.) until you die.

    The 'it' is definitely necessary.

    Is that what you mean?
    thank you so much~
    I mean I hear something in general, like brids singing.

    I didn't know that my sentence can be understood like you mentioned.

    That's why my professor didn't give me a high score....
     

    Rational_gaze

    Senior Member
    British English
    thank you so much~
    I mean I hear something in general, like brids singing.
    Happy to try to help, jjshin.

    I think I misunderstood what meaning you were trying to convey. I thought you meant that what they said would 'haunt' you until you die. If you mean you will be able to hear in general, then you shouldn't use the 'it'... although then it seems slightly odd to me that hearing something from a teenager would be linked to being able to hear for the rest of your life. Was what the teenager said the first thing that 'you' heard after an operation to restore your hearing, or something like that?
     
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