I hope you will come tomorrow<?>

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  • anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It's not uncommon for people to sometimes 'questionize' statements to indicate they would like clarification on what they are saying, while for whatever reason they don't want to ask directly. But outside of a particular context, as heypresto said, I'm not sure whether your example works.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I would have thought you would know whether you hoped something would happen without needing to ask someone else.
    But couldn't it be a way of indicating to the person you're speaking to that you'd really like them to come tomorrow? Like perhaps "I hope you can (you'll be able to) come tomorrow."? (More informally, "I hope you can make it tomorrow.")
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    But couldn't it be a way of indicating to the person you're speaking to that you'd really like them to come tomorrow? Like perhaps "I hope you can (you'll be able to) come tomorrow."? (More informally, "I hope you can make it tomorrow.")
    Not that I can see. Turning it into a question appears to suggest doubt, presumably about whether they can come tomorrow. But the sentence isn't about whether they can come tomorrow but your hopes. However, questions might be used like this in varieties of English other than my own.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    Can the question mark be placed at the end of this sentence:
    I hope you will come tomorrow?
    No. Grammatically, question marks end interrogative sentences. English has 4 sentence types:

    interrogative sentences (questions)
    exclamatory sentences (exclamations)
    imperative sentences (commands or requests)
    declarative statements (statements).

    Although the example sentence might be a polite way of asking "do you plan to come tomorrow?", it is still a declarative sentence. So it ends in a period, not a question mark. Punctuation is about grammar, not purpose.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    Written English has no way to reproduce the wide variety of meanings that spoken English sentences have.

    A common game is to write a sentence of 7 or 8 words, and then show that those words, in that order, can have 4 or 5 completely different meanings, just by changes in intonation (syllable stress and phrase intonation). All 4 or 5 are correct sentences, with no change in the written form.

    I hope you will come tomorrow.
    This is usually a statement, not a question. It can be turned into a question, by context and intonation. There is no easy way to show that in writing.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    AE (US English)
    No, the difference is grammar. One is a statement (a declarative sentence). The other is a question (an interrogative sentence).

    "I hope you will come tomorrow." is called an "indirect question", if it is said in a questioning tone. An indirect question uses a period, not a question mark. That is what I was trying to explain, by saying "punctuation is about grammar".

    I'm not sure why a comment about grammar is "harsh". I did not intend harshness.
     

    Frenk969

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Without "I hope", it seems something one would say to make a question using the tone of voice rather than auxiliaries and/or inversion.

    I cannot think of any other way of saying that apart from question tags, even though perhaps then the sentence would be slightly different from what you meant it to be.

    "You will come tomorrow, won't you?"

    Otherwise, As already said, I see no other option. Besides, as other people already mentioned above, when it comes to putting a spoken sentence into words down on paper, it may get quite complex.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    That can easily be a question when speaking to someone, when the right tone of voice is applied.

    It would be a bad idea to try to write it in a dialogue and expect it to be understood that way.
     
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