I intended to call on you last night, but it rained.

quietdandelion

Banned
Formosa/Chinese
I intended to call on you last night, but it rained.
I intended to have called on you last night, but it rained.



Do both of the above make sense to you? If not, why not?
 
  • quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, sound shift, for your consideration.
    But my grammar book states the second one is the right choice, while the first is not. This is realling shocking; is this grammar rule out of date?
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hello again, QD,

    I feel I should add for the sake of clarity that I do not possess a grammar book and was not taught many rules of grammar at school. It is possible that the "rule" you mention appears in a lot of grammar books. However, my personal usage does not coincide with this "rule".
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    I find the opposite to be the case: (1) is the the correct sentence. This is about sequence of tenses. At the time you had the intention, the intention was "to call" not to "have called". If you were asked at the time: "What do you intend to do?", you would not have said "I intend to have called you", you would say: "I intend to call you". Therefore, you "intended to call me".

    Informally, I would say "I meant to call last night, but it was raining."

    I would be interested to know what this rule actually says.
     

    quietdandelion

    Banned
    Formosa/Chinese
    Thanks, my helpful friends.
    The rule states that if your hope, expection, wish, and intention were not realized in the past, you should use the following construction:

    S+{hoped/wished/intended/expected/meant}+to+have+p.p.

    I presume that it's a bit like subjunctive in that you hoped ... something in the past but it didn't come true. Therefere, "to have+p.p." is used in this construction. I'm surprised that your usage doesn't conincide with this pattern.
     

    sorry66

    Senior Member
    English, England
    Only 1 is correct. Example - I intended to write you a private message quietdandelion on the subject of incessantly changing your threads but I then I thought better of it.
    All the native English speakers seem to be against this rule.
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    1. I intended to call on you last night, but it rained.
    2. I intended to have called on you last night, but it rained.
    # 1 is fine. So is a variant on it:
    1. b. I had intended to call on you last night, but it rained.

    Both refer to a situation in the past.

    2. Doesn't make sense to me.

    I intended (that's clear enough) to have called on... (this part seems to refer to a period prior to the one in which I did my intending. That's a temporal jumble. Or does it attempt to refer to a past intention to have done something in a relative future? Even more of a jumble.)

    My rule is that if it sounds very odd, not at all idiomatic, then it's wise to question the
    supposed rule that governs it. Number two qualifies.
     
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