"I like me" or "I like myself".

Discussion in 'English Only' started by wolfbm1, May 18, 2010.

  1. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    In "I Like Myself!" by Karen Beaumont I found the following sentences:
    "I like myself! I'm glad I'm me.
    There's no one else I'd rather be.
    ...
    I like me fast. I like me slow.
    I like me everywhere I go."

    I thought that one should always say "I like myself" because the subject is the same as the object. Is "I like me" grammatical? Is there any difference in meaning between "I like me" and "I like myself"?
     
  2. IParleFrench Senior Member

    Chicago
    English - USA
    It's not grammatical. She's doing it to be cute, to sounds like a small child talking, and to rhyme with "be."
     
  3. . . . and to fit the metre of the verse.
     
  4. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    I found a similar sentence in the song "She's my soulmate" .

    "She gets up early - I get up late,
    But that's ok - she's my soulmate.
    ...
    She finishes work - I watch TV
    I don't do much - I just drink tea.
    But she still loves me - I love me too.
    We're a great team - yes it's true."

    This song is in "Total English Starter" coursebook by Jonathan Bygrave.

    "I love me too." should be "I love myself too.", shouldn't it?
    Is it ok to say ""I love me." or "I like me." informally?
     
  5. se16teddy

    se16teddy Senior Member

    London but from Yorkshire
    English - England
    It is not OK to say when someone is sitting in judgment on you as a speaker of conventional standard English.

    Among friends, of course, anything goes.
     
  6. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Thank you very much for your comments.
     
  7. Myridon

    Myridon Senior Member

    Texas
    English - US
    I think the "too" becomes a problem with that change.
    she loves me and I love her, too :tick:
    she loves herself and I love myself, too :tick:
    she loves me and I love myself :tick:
    she loves me and I love myself, too :confused:
     
  8. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    That's interesting.
     
  9. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English
    It's "poetic licence".

    People often play with words in songs and poetry.

    Great rhythm. It would flop with "myself".
    I like me fast. I like me slow.
    I like me everywhere I go."


    There is a neat symmetry in
    She loves me, I love me, too
    .
     
  10. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    So "I love me" does not jar on your ears when it is used in poetry. And I guess it can be used in everyday speech between friends. Never in an English test.
     
  11. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    It probably depends on how sophisticated the English test is, whether it includes contexts in which I love me fits.

    I don't think the issue is formal/informal as much as philosophical. Do I love myself in a reflexive way, or do I love me just as anyone else might love me?
     
  12. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    How would you report the sentence "I love me, too"?
    "He loves him, too."
    OR
    "He loves himself, too"?
     
  13. pickarooney

    pickarooney Senior Member

    Provence, France
    English (Ireland)
    I agree with Myridon and Forero that there is a notional difference in using the apparently ungrammatical "I love me".
    Certainly "I love myself too" implies "She loves herself" rather than "She loves me" and I 'feel' a distinction between the reflexive appreciation of "I love myself" and the objective "I love me".

    As regards reporting the sentence above, wolfbm1, I would need to have the previous sentence to know what the 'too' refers to in order to make a decision.
     
  14. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    It comes from the song "She's my soulmate" .

    "She gets up early - I get up late,
    But that's ok - she's my soulmate.
    She eats a salad - I eat a pizza
    But she's my soulmate - I love her, I need her.
    She finishes work - I watch TV
    I don't do much - I just drink tea.
    But she still loves me - I love me too.
    We're a great team - yes it's true."

    So the singer does not sound as overtly selfish when he says "I love me too." because this statement is kind of objective and is in symmetry with "she still loves me ". If he said "I love myself too" that would be openly selfish. That's what I conclude.

    The sentence: "But she still loves me - I love me too." Can you report it like this: "But she still loves him - he loves him too." or "But she still loves him - he loves himself too."?
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
  15. Forero Senior Member

    Houston, Texas, USA
    USA English
    Indirect quotes are a slippery slope because we always have a choice to inject our own point of view. We might use any of the following to say that he said "I love me too":

    He said he loves him too.
    He said he loved him too.
    He said he loves himself too.
    He said he loved himself too.

    Depending on what we think he means/meant. And we might use himself rather than him just to make clear that the object of his love is/was not some other "him". (Me would not likely refer to another "me".)
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2010
  16. Brioche

    Brioche Senior Member

    Adelaide
    Australia English

    It would not really work with "him", because that would be a different person.

    Ziggy loves Ziggy = Ziggy loves himself = He loves himself.

    Ziggy loves Tom = Ziggy loves him = He loves him.
     
  17. crisdecordoba New Member

    Buenos Aires, Argentina
    argentinian spanish
    I think that this phrases are expression or argot, that we said, We cann't translation, because dont have translation.
    If it is mistake please, tell me.
    Thank you
     
  18. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Hello crisdecordoba. Thank you for your comment. I agree that sometimes it is very hard to translate certain English expressions into another language and the other way around. Especially the phrases or actually sentences: "I love me." and "I love myself". I think I know the difference between the two sentences but I'm not absolutely sure. That's why I keep asking questions.
     
  19. wolfbm1

    wolfbm1 Senior Member

    Poland
    Polish
    Let's say we want to say the following sentences from another person's perspective:
    He: "But she still loves me - I love me too.
    We're a great team - yes it's true."

    Now, how does this sound:

    She: "But I still love him - he loves him too.
    We love each other - yes it's true." ??

    Could we replace "We love each other" with "We love us" or "We love ourselves?
     

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