I like to play soccer

Danke fur das Gift

New Member
English
I am new time poster here and in a German class at my school. Awhile ago my teacher taught us to use gern when learning about hobbies, for example;
Ich spiele gern Fußball- meaning "I like to play soccer."
But recently when learning about models such as mörgen- to like to, we were given the example;
Ich mag Fußball spielen- also meaning "I like playing soccer"

Does anyone her know which native German speakers use and in what situations..Perhaps it has something to do with high/low German.
 
  • Riverplatense

    Senior Member
    German — Austria
    If you say Ich spiele gerne Fußball, you talk about a general attitude.

    When, however, you say Ich mag Fußball spielen (although I'd rather say Ich möchte/will Fußball spielen), you let understand that in this very moment you want to go playing soccer.

    However, there are formulations where both more or less mean the same:
    Ich esse gerne Eis. (I like eating ice cream).
    Ich mag Eis. (I like eating ice cream).
    In this case, the second example shows a pretty low stylistic level (and wouldn't be written) and can mean both a general affection and an actual desire while Ich esse gerne Eis only describes a general affection.

    If, however, you want to express your momentary desire using «beautiful» German you'd better write Ich würde jetzt gerne ein Eis essen.
     

    Danke fur das Gift

    New Member
    English
    If you say Ich spiele gerne Fußball, you talk about a general attitude.

    When, however, you say Ich mag Fußball spielen (although I'd rather say Ich möchte/will Fußball spielen), you let understand that in this very moment you want to go playing soccer.

    However, there are formulations where both more or less mean the same:
    Ich esse gerne Eis. (I like eating ice cream).
    Ich mag Eis. (I like eating ice cream).
    In this case, the second example shows a pretty low stylistic level (and wouldn't be written) and can mean both a general affection and an actual desire while Ich esse gerne Eis only describes a general affection.

    If, however, you want to express your momentary desire using «beautiful» German you'd better write Ich würde jetzt gerne ein Eis essen.
    Ok thankyou for answer this question, my German teacher was unable to!
    Would watching be applied to the eating or playing ice cream example, as in would saying Ich sehe gern Fußball and Ich mag Fußball sehen be the same or would saying Ich sehe gern Fußball mean you want to watch soccer now.
     

    Frank78

    Senior Member
    German
    Basically there's the same difference in German "mögen" vs "möchten" as in English "like" vs "would like".

    Ich mag Fußball. (I like football)
    Ich mag Fußballspiele. (I like football matches)

    Ich möchte (jetzt) Fußball spielen. (I'd like to play football (now) )

    Does anyone her know which native German speakers use and in what situations..Perhaps it has something to do with high/low German.

    High and Low German have nothing to do with a certain register. They refer to areas: Low German (coastal) and High German (upper regions). They are almost two different languages.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German
     

    Danke fur das Gift

    New Member
    English
    Basically there's the same difference in German "mögen" vs "möchten" as in English "like" vs "would like".

    Ich mag Fußball. (I like football)
    Ich mag Fußballspiele. (I like football matches)

    Ich möchte (jetzt) Fußball spielen. (I'd like to play football (now) )
    But that's not really the problem, (neither using forms of "I like to play soccer" to whoever changed the title). The question is if saying
    Ich mag Fußball.
    and Ich spiele gern Fußall are the same and if what situations they should be used.

    Riverplatense said that Ich mag Fußball spielen would mean "I want to play soccer" but Ich mag Eis essen would still mean "I like to eat icecream". Now the question is which verbs follow the "Fußball" example and which follow the "Eis" example
     

    Riverplatense

    Senior Member
    German — Austria
    High and Low German have nothing to do with a certain register. They refer to areas: Low German (coastal) and High German (upper regions). They are almost two different languages.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low_German

    Due to my poor English skills I seem to have confused low/high German (Niederdeutsch/Hochdeutsch) with the respective registers (gehobenes/umgangssprachliches Deutsch).

    Danke fur das Gift said:
    The question is if saying
    Ich mag Fußball.
    and Ich spiele gern Fußall are the same and if what situations they should be used.

    Riverplatense said that Ich mag Fußball spielen would mean "I want to play soccer" but Ich mag Eis essen would still mean "I like to eat icecream". Now the question is which verbs follow the "Fußball" example and which follow the "Eis" example

    Well, if you only use the noun without a verb, like Ich mag Fußball, Ich mag Eis, Ich mag die deutsche Sprache, it's always perceived as a general comment: I (generally) like soccer/ice cream/the German language.

    When you combine them with a verb, in most cases you express a momentary desire, to say you comment a real intention: Ich mag/möchte Fußball spielen. Ich möchte die deutsche Sprache erlernen. Ich möchte ein Eis essen.

    In some situations and contexts, also Ich mag Eis essen can be understood as a general comment, but when you write something on your own, you can be sure that
    Ich möchte Fußball spielen.
    always means that you (now) want to play soccer and that
    Ich mag Fußball.
    always means that you generally like soccer, even though in some situations they can additionally have another meaning.

    In order to describe a general inclination towards football you could also use a Infinitivgruppe:
    Ich mag es(,) Fußball zu spielen.
    Ich mag es(,) zu lesen.
     

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska
    When, however, you say Ich mag Fußball spielen (although I'd rather say Ich möchte/will Fußball spielen), you let understand that in this very moment you want to go playing soccer.

    Could it really mean ''i want to play football'?

    I thought, that would be a 'lower' version of 'ich spiele Fussbal gern' that you should not use writing for instance a CV.

    @Kajjo @Hutschi
     

    bearded

    Senior Member
    Ich mag.. Fußball spielen.
    Ist diese Schreibweise wirklich korrekt, oder sollte es Ich mag Fußballspielen sein? In meinem Verständnis hat 'mögen+Verb' eine andere Bedeutung (zB. er mag auch Fußball spielen, sehr geschickt ist er darin jedoch nicht..). Ich denke, einem 'mag' im Sinne von like sollte nur ein Substantiv folgen ('möchte' ist eine andere Geschichte).
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Hi,
    1. "Ich mag Fußballspielen" (noun) means I like playing football, but it is seldom used. I think it is blocked by the meaning in 2. or is just seldom used because "Ich spiele gern Fußball" sounds more idiomatically.

    2. Ich mag Fußball spielen, ... (verb) = Wenn ich auch Fußball spiele, ... = Es mag sein, dass ich Fußball spiele = Ich räume ein, dass ich vielleicht Fußball spiele
    Example: Ich mag Fußball spielen, aber das ist sehr selten. May be, I play sometimes football ... (as bearded described). Note the spelling Fußball spielen in two words.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Genau. Die Grammatik ist:
    etwas mögen, nach etwas Verlangen haben: Duden | mögen | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition, Synonyme, Herkunft
    2.a.
    für etwas eine Neigung, Vorliebe haben; etwas nach seinem Geschmack finden, gernhaben

    Wir sehen, hier ist ein Substantiv oder ein Pronomen erforderlich.

    Auch ein substantiviertes Verb ist möglich.
    Beispiel:
    das Fußballspielen wird zusammengeschrieben.
    Duden | Fußballspielen | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition

    In anderen Bedeutungen sind auch Verben möglich.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    If you say Ich spiele gerne Fußball, you talk about a general attitude.

    When, however, you say Ich mag Fußball spielen (although I'd rather say Ich möchte/will Fußball spielen), you let understand that in this very moment you want to go playing soccer.
    ...
    Hi, at least in my area it is not idiomatisch this way. I'd say "Ich möchte (gern) Fußball spielen."
    "Ich mag Fußbass spielen" (verb "spielen") has another meaning and stand alone it does not look idiomatically.. May be it can change the meaning by context: "Ich mag jetzt gern Fußball spielen." But I would use the Konjunktiv "möchte" in this case, too.

    Corrected typo. I speak about the verb phrase "Fußball spielen".
     

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska
    "Ich mag jetzt gern Fußball spielen

    I think it could also mean that for example 1 year ago you didn't like playing football but now you got used to it and like it. What do you think?

    If we add 'jetzt' i think it can possibly mean both.

    'Ich mag jetzt schlafen'. I'd like to sleep now. I'm tired.
    'Ich mag jetzt schlafen/Schlafen'. When i used to go to highschool, i wasn't a big fan of sleeping, i had to learn a lot, but now i like sleeping a lot.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I think too, if you add "jetzt" and/or "gern" it works with "mag". But it sounds like regional usage. I am not sure, however.

    "Ich mag jetzt Schlafen." I think uppercase it is not idiomatic, except in very special context.
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    If we add 'jetzt' i think it can possibly mean both.
    For me, 'jetzt' doesn't change anything:
    I'd like to sleep now. = 'Ich möchte jetzt schlafen'. and not 'Ich mag jetzt schlafen':mad:. 'Ich mag jetzt Schlafen'.:cross:
    Das Modalverb mögen hat zwei Hauptbedeutungen, nämlich den Wunsch haben, etwas zu tun oder an etwas oder jemandem Gefallen finden. Die erste Bedeutung drückt hauptsächlich der Konjunktiv II Präteritum aus, die zweite der Indikativ.
    Ich möchte noch ein Stück Pizza essen. Konjunktiv II Präteritum Wunsch: Ich habe den Wunsch, noch ein Stück Pizza zu essen.
    Ich mag Pizza sehr gern. Indikativ Gefallen: Ich finde großen Gefallen daran, Pizza zu essen.
    1. mögen wird meistens als Vollverb verwendet. Es wird mit einem Akkusativobjekt verbunden, das eine Person oder Nicht-Person sein kann. Die ausgedrückte Bedeutung ist wie erwähnt an etwas oder jemandem Gefallen finden.
    2. Nur selten wird mögen mit einem Infinitiv verbunden, in diesem Fall wird der Ausdruck etwas gern tun bevorzugt.
    3. Sehr selten drückt mögen die Bedeutung eines Wunsches aus. Das kommt dann fast nur in verneinten Sätzen oder Fragesätzen vor.
     
    Last edited:

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska
    @Hutschi

    If you add a negation-word like, you can make a sencence like this one:

    Ich mag nicht schlafen-i dont want to go to sleep at the moment.
    Ich mag jetzt nicht schlafen-i dont want to go to sleep at the moment. So, no difference.

    But if it comes to an affirmation-sentence, i have been told, its not working.

    mögen + Verb
    ,,Außer man will statt einer allgemeinen Aussage (Ich tanze gerne) eine konkrete treffen: Ich mag/möchte jetzt tanzen.''

    Ich mag jetzt tanzen:

    1)Ich mag jetzt tanzen und in mir das Kind wieder mal rauslassen.
    2)Früher habe ich nur ungern getantzt, ich habe lieber Bücher gelesen, jetzt mag ich aber tanzen/Tanzen, weil mir das Vergnügen, das Tanzen mit sich bringt, aufging.
     

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska
    For me, 'jetzt' doesn't change anything:
    I'd like to sleep now. = 'Ich möchte jetzt schlafen'. and not 'Ich mag jetzt schlafen':mad:. 'Ich mag jetzt Schlafen'.:cross:


    Yes, i think, you're right. You can surely say
    ich mag ins Theater
    ich mag nicht ins Theater
    ich mag nicht ins Theater gehen (negation)

    aber nicht

    Ich mag ins Theater gehen As far as a desire is concerned.

    If you speak about things you like doing, i would say

    ich mag mit der Bahn reisen.
    Ich reise mit der Bahn gern
    Ich habe es gern mit der Bahn zu reisen

    are equal. I was told, the 1st. possibility it the last one to choose.

    But there are some native speakers, that say, it is possible, to say mag instead of möchte when you speak about desires you want to make real right now

    @Hutschi @JClaudeK

    There is also a small book for children, named ,,Jetzt mag ich schlafen''.

    Jetzt mag ich schlafen: Amazon.de: Susa Hämmerle, Martina Gollnick: Bücher


    Does ,,Jetzt mag ich schlafen'' in this kontext mean
    i'd like to go to sleep now

    or

    Now (nowadays) i like sleeping.
    ?
     
    Last edited:

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Yes, i think, you're right. You can surely say
    ich mag ins Theater :cross:
    ich mag nicht ins Theater :cross:
    ich mag nicht ins Theater gehen (negation)
    - possible, but "ich gehe nicht gern ins Theater" is better.

    If you speak about things you like doing, i would say
    ich mag mit der Bahn reisen. :(
    Ich reise mit der Bahn gern :cross:Ich reise gern mit der Bahn.:tick:
    Ich habe es gern, mit der Bahn zu reisen. :(
    Does ,,Jetzt mag ich schlafen'' in this kontext mean
    i'd like to go to sleep now
    Yes, but
    2. Nur selten wird mögen mit einem Infinitiv verbunden, in diesem Fall wird der Ausdruck etwas gern tun bevorzugt. (see #16)

    ,,Jetzt mag ich schlafen.'' (= i'd like to go to sleep now) ist "Kindersprache", kein Standarddeutsch.
     
    Last edited:

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    The problem may be a language change.

    "Ich mag" in the sent "I want/ I like to" is replaced by "ich möchte". In some phrases the old "mag" is available, for example in "ich mag nicht".

    "Ich mag mit der Bahn reisen" has basically two meanings, but "möchte" replaced one of it. such things often occure in languages.
    Homonym-aversion + blocking with another word.

    I found old sources for similar constructions:

    Deutsches Lesebuch

    "Mit Gunst, dass ich mag aufstehen, ..." it is from 1822. Today I would use this only in historical context to sound very old ... (For example in a time travel story.)
    "Mag" is here "kann" or "würde". (Can it be "will"? than it is similar to "möchte".)
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member

    ich mag mit der Bahn reisen. :confused: Possible is "Ich mag es, mit der Bahn zu reisen." = I like it.
    Ich reise mit der Bahn gern :tick:Ich reise gern
    mit der Bahn.:tick:
    The meaning is different.
    Ich reise gern mit der Bahn. (neutral) vs. Ich reise mit der Bahn gern. (mit der Bahn is the essential part, it is not about that I like bus bus or ship.)


    Ich habe es gern, mit der Bahn zu reisen. :tick:

    edit, I added remarks:
    "Ich mag mit der Bahn reisen is" grammatically possible in principle but in the meaning we want to express it is blocked by "Ich möchte mit der Bahn reisen." and by the second meaning: "Es könnte ja sein, dass ich mit der Bahn reise."

    In the negated form the second meaning would not make sense and cannot block it.
     
    Last edited:

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska

    ich mag mit der Bahn reisen. :confused: Possible is "Ich mag es, mit der Bahn zu reisen." = I like it.
    Ich reise mit der Bahn gern :tick:Ich reise gern
    mit der Bahn.:tick:
    The meaning is different.
    Ich reise gern mit der Bahn. (neutral) vs. Ich reise mit der Bahn gern. (mit der Bahn is the essential part, it is not about that I like bus bus or ship.)


    Ich habe es gern, mit der Bahn zu reisen. :tick:

    edit, I added remarks:
    "Ich mag mit der Bahn reisen is" grammatically possible in principle but in the meaning we want to express it is blocked by "Ich möchte mit der Bahn reisen." and by the second meaning: "Es könnte ja sein, dass ich mit der Bahn reise."

    In the negated form the second meaning would not make sense and cannot block it.


    So, what does that basically mean ich mag mit der Bahn reisen.?

    If there's a very special context, we can say

    Ich weiß nicht, wie er die Welt bereisen möchte, aber er mag mit der Bahn oder mit dem Flugzeug reisen (vielleicht). (I replaced 'ich' with 'er' cause 'er' is more possible to encounter such a situation.
    Ich mag mit der Bahn reisen, aber es wird sowieso nicht schneller als zu Fuß, wo es auf der Bahnstrecke 40 Km vor Berlin einen Unfall gibt.

    These two meanings we all know, but i still dont know if there are some others possible.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    So, what does that basically mean ich mag mit der Bahn reisen.?

    If there's a very special context, we can say

    Ich weiß nicht, wie er die Welt bereisen möchte, aber er mag mit der Bahn oder mit dem Flugzeug reisen:tick: (vielleicht). (I replaced 'ich' with 'er' cause 'er' is more possible to encounter such a situation.
    Ich mag mit der Bahn reisen, aber es wird sowieso nicht schneller als zu Fuß, wo es auf der Bahnstrecke 40 Km vor Berlin einen Unfall gibt.:tick:

    These two meanings we all know, but i still dont know if there are some others possible.

    Hi, the meanings are basically the same:
    Ich weiß nicht, wie er die Welt bereisen möchte, aber es mag/kann sein, dass er mit der Bahn oder mit dem Flugzeug reist.
    Ich könnte/mag mit der Bahn reisen, aber es wird sowieso nicht schneller als zu Fuß, wo es auf der Bahnstrecke 40 Km vor Berlin einen Unfall gibt.

    It is similar to may/can - in certain context they are almost the same.

    In neiver of these cases it means He likes to do it. It means he may/can/could do it
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I have been always told that

    ich mag schwimmen the same what ich schwimme gern means:cross:, but it is idiomatic to say ich schwimme gern:tick:
    This translation is wrong. "Ich mag schwimmen" means "I may actually be swimming/I could swim/it might be the case that I swim ... , but ...
    "Mag" requires a noun. "Ich mag Schwimmen" is correct but seldom used and not very idiomatic. More idiomatic is "Ich mag es zu schwimmen." and also "Ich mag das Schwimmen."

    In spoken German you cannot hear a difference.

    If they told you did they tell you the spelling, too? Upper and lower case spelling changes the meaning and helps you to see the correct meaning, but it is not easy.

    (Edit) some adjustments.
     
    Last edited:

    Korba007

    Senior Member
    Polski-Polska
    "Ich mag Schwimmen" is correct but seldom used and not very idiomatic. More idiomatic is "Ich mag es zu schwimmen." and also "Ich mag das Schwimmen."

    In spoken German you cannot hear a difference.

    1. Is "Ich mag das Schwimmen. fully idiomatic ? 'I thought , 'Das' is always beeing left out. I'm i right?
    2. So, you get "Ich mag Schwimmen". ''Schwimmen'' is in this case a noun. But as you said, you won't hear a difference if 'Schwimmen'' is beeing considered as ''Schwimmen''-a noun or 'schwimmen'-as a verb.

    Edit: i found some sentences:
    a) Wer, der im Gegenteil das Radfahren mag, sollte nicht den Weg " Marcialonga ", unten in der Senke, vermissen.
    b) ich liebe das Radfahren und möchte dieses Vergnügen
    gerne mir anderen Personen teilen.

    So, i was wrong...

    Let us summarize:
    1)ich mag schwimmen-in the sense of 'ich schwimme gern'-false
    2)Ich mag das Schwimmen and Ich mag es zu schwimmen-correct.


    But if there are actions you cannot describe with one noun, for example

    'morgens im kalten Wasser baden'. You cannot make a noun 'Morgensimkaltenwasserbaden'

    So, if you would like to express that you like an action, would you use.
    1. Ich mag morgens im kalten wasser baden-false
    2.Ich mag es, morgens...zu baden'correct.
    3. Ich mag das 'Morgensimkaltenwasserbaden' would be correct but because of the incapability of making a noun like this, false.
    4. Ich bade gerne morgens im Kalten Wasser-first choice.

    But there are still sentences like this one: ,,
    Wer schwimmen mag, und wenn der Strand direkt
    vor der Tür sein soll, kann hier aus drei Buchten auswählen: Die Platja son[...]
    Moll, die Cala Agulla und die Cala Gat.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Ich mag schwimmen- ist im Sinne von "Ich mag es zu schwimmen" falsch.
    Korrekt wäre es aber im Sinne einer Einräumung: "es kann schon sein":

    Ich mag schwimmen, aber das spielt für diesen Fall keine Rolle. Es kann schon sein, dass ich schwimmen, aber ...

    Da man es mündlich nicht trennen kann, muss man den Kontext beachten. Es kommt aber mündlich kaum vor.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    3. Ich mag das 'Morgensimkaltenwasserbaden' would be correct but because of the incapability of making a noun like this, false.
    Es wäre möglich.
    Man schreibt dann aber mit Bindestrichen:

    Ich mag das Morgens-im-kalten-Wasser-Baden. (edit: I am not sure if "Leben" is correct lower case or upper case here or if both is possible. I changed it to the pattern in the example.)

    It is possible to generate nouns like this.

    see here:

    Der Horror mit den substantivischen Zusammensetzungen | Sprach|regeln | Sprachleben

    Die Bindestrichschreibung ist immer dann gefragt, wenn die substantivischen Komposita komplex sind (insbesondere bei mehr als zwei Bestandteilen) oder verdeutlicht bzw. gekennzeichnet werden soll, was gemeint ist.
    ...
    Nicht substantivische Wörter oder Einzelbuchstaben, wenn sie am Anfang einer Zusammensetzung stehen, die als Ganzes die Eigenschaften eines Substantivs hat, werden ebenfalls großgeschrieben und mit Bindestrich verbunden.

    Beispiele: das In-den-Tag-hinein-Leben, der Trimm-dich-Pfad, die S-Kurve
    ...
     
    Top