I live/am living in Korea now.

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EdisonBhola

Senior Member
Korean
Hi all,

I remember being told before that when we are speaking about where we live now, we should use the present tense, not the present continuous. But is it wrong to use the present continuous?

e.g. I live in Korea now. vs I am living in Korea now.

Many thanks!
 
  • reno33

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Although technically these two tenses have their specific uses, the fact is that in normal, informal everyday usage, these tenses are interchangeably used when establishing your current domicile.

    I have heard both tenses used for this very sentence: "I live in":tick:...... and "I am living in....":tick:

    Even when the question is asked in one particular tense.........Where are you living? for example, one can easily and correctly reply: 'I live in Chicago"......or Where do you live?......."I am living in Chicago."
     

    EdisonBhola

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Although technically these two tenses have their specific uses, the fact is that in normal, informal everyday usage, these tenses are interchangeably used when establishing your current domicile. I have heard both tenses for this very sentence: "I live":tick:...... and "I am living....":tick:

    .......
    Thanks a lot.
     

    owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    But is it wrong to use the present continuous?
    No. Using the continuous may suggest to your listener that this is something new for you. It might also suggest that it is a temporary arrangement.

    I expect to hear I live in Korea without now if you merely want to tell somebody about where you have been living for a long time: Where do you live? I live in Korea. (I have been living in Korea for a long time and I consider Korea to be my home.)
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    With verbs denoting a situation that normally extends over a considerable period in time (live and work are examples) there is often no significant difference in meaning between the continuous and non-continuous forms.

    However, in school exercises and examinations, I would advise learners to use continuous forms only when it is clear that the situation denoted has limited duration. Some teachers and examiners appear to believe that there are clear-cut rules about this.
     
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