I look forward to it.

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mountainbiker1

New Member
english- England
I look forward to it.
Usually 'tengo ganas de + verb' it seems but can't figure out how to use this expression here- no verb.
How would you say this? Cheers,
 
  • Kaastorp

    Senior Member
    SPAIN; Castilian Spanish & Catalan
    In Spanish we do not use the 'it' so often after verbs. Eg: I like it...
    So the translation would be something like:
    Tengo ganas or me apetece. As simple as that. The referent to 'it' should have come up earlier in the text.
     

    Me Again

    Senior Member
    English -American
    We'll see what some natives say, but you could simply say "Estoy muy emocionado." When you're "looking forward to something" it pretty much means the same thing as being excited about it.
     

    Me Again

    Senior Member
    English -American
    For me "tengo ganas" doesn't work in this situation. "Tener ganas de" means to want to do something. I want to do something is not the same as I'm looking forward to doing something.

    Examples:

    I look forward to seeing you on Saturday. Estoy muy emocionado por verte el s'abado.

    I want to see you Saturday. Tengo ganas de verte el s'abado.

    There might be a better way than "emocionado" for "looking forward".
     
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    hernandezmanuel671

    New Member
    Spanish - Mexico
    Normally you wouldn't express like that when writing a letter or an email, I'd probably say "Quedo atento a su respuesta" (i.e. "I look forward to your reply")

    Alternatively, you could say "Quedo a la espera de..." and then confirm the action that you are expecting from them to act upon
     

    cartwheel8

    Member
    English - US
    How do you say, "Looking forward to it"?

    In my case, the "it" I'm referring to that made me ask this question is a phone conversation I'm having tomorrow with a friend, but I'm also wondering how to say "Looking forward to it" in general, in a situation where you already have an established relationship with the person and are looking forward to plans you have together soon -- such as, a party, or a lunch. So not a job interview or something formal with a person you don't know.

    Looking through other posts here, I've seen "tener ganas" but I'm not sure if it carries the same feeling or meaning. "Looking forward" to something means you're excited for it to happen.

    Thanks in advance.

    ----

    ¿Cómo se dice, "Looking forward to it"?

    En mi caso, el "it" al que me refiero y la razón por esta pregunta es una llamada que tengo mañana con un amigo, pero también me pregunto cómo se dice "Looking forward to it" en general, en una situación en la que ya tienes una relación establecida con la persona y "esperas con emoción o entusiasmo" planes que tienen juntos pronto -- como una fiesta o un almuerzo. Así que no para una entrevista para empleo o algo formal con alguien que no conoces.

    Después de mirar otros aportes/posts en este foro, he visto "tener ganas" pero no sé si eso lleva el mismo sentimiento o significado. "Looking forward" a algo quiere decir que estás emocionad@ para que, o hasta que, ese algo ocurra.

    Gracias de antemano.
     

    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    No hay una expresión tan específica en español, por eso hay propuestas muy diferentes. Deberías buscar otra manera de decir lo mismo en inglés y entonces traducirlo.
     

    pogomole

    Member
    English-Western U.S.
    I had the same question when I was learning Spanish and never found an exact equivalent. They don't say that! They say something else, maybe "hasta entonces" or "no puedo esperar salir contigo" or some of the other phrases people have suggested. Some idiomatic expressions can't be translated literally; you have to find out what they would say in the same circumstance.
     

    cartwheel8

    Member
    English - US
    "Looking forward to it" es algo muy común en el inglés estadounidense. Tal vez, "Con ganas" o "Con muchas ganas" sirva.

    O, como dice @pogomole, puedo decir "Hasta entonces" y la emoción la muestro con el tono de voz o una sonrisa.
     

    jmx

    Senior Member
    Spain / Spanish
    The best translation will depend a lot on the degree of formality and the context in which you're speaking. If you narrow down the situation, you could get better proposals.
     

    Cerros de Úbeda

    Banned
    UK
    Spanish - Spain (Galicia)
    - Estar esperando con impaciencia + INF / SN.
    - Estar impaciente por + INF / SN.

    For me "tengo ganas" doesn't work in this situation. "Tener ganas de" means to want to do something.

    Examples:
    I look forward to seeing you on Saturday.
    I disagree...

    In my view, 'tener ganas de', and 'apetecerle + inf' may very well include that sense of expectation or excitement implicit in 'to look forward to'.

    I think Kaastorp's option is a good one, that would work in this context as well;

    - Tengo ganas de verte el sábado.
    - Me apetece verte el sábado.

    More emphatic;

    - Tengo muchas ganas de verte el sábado.
    - Me apetece mucho verte el sábado.

    More colloquially;

    'Estoy con ganas de verte el sábado.'
    'Me muero de ganas de verte el sábado.'

    'Me hace mucha ilusión / Estoy con ilusión de verte el sábado.
    'Tengo mucha ilusión por verte el sábado.'

    How do you say, "Looking forward to it"?

    In my case, the "it" I'm referring to that made me ask this question is a phone conversation I'm having tomorrow with a friend, but I'm also wondering how to say "Looking forward to it" in general,

    It's true that this expression is tricky to get right in its nuance in Spanish.

    However, I think part of the problem across this thread is that we don't have an actual example sentence as context, as the OP has given just the expression by itself, without other sentences for context.

    So, some people have interpreted it as one thing (a reference to a previous comment), and others, as something else (a formal farewell in an email).

    For your phone call example I'd say;

    - Estoy deseando hablar con... mañana.
    (= 'Estoy deseando que llegue la hora de hablar con... (mañana))
    - Estoy deseando (que llegue) la conversación con ... mañana.'
    - Estoy esperando por la conversación con ... mañana.'

    - Estoy esperando (con impaciencia) hablar con... mañana
    (= Estoy esperando con impaciencia la llamada de mañana)
    - Estoy impaciente por hablar con... mañana
    (= Estoy impaciente por la llamada de mañana)

    (*) Note:
    - Usage of the continuous tense:
    Note the usage of the 'present continuous' with both 'deseando' and 'esperando', in order to give that active or involved sense of 'expectation', 'impatience' or 'emotion' contained in the English.


    Tal vez, "Con ganas" o "Con muchas ganas" sirva.
    No...

    'Con ganas' could be taken to mean something bad, as it is often used in reference to doing something aggressively; 'The footballer kicked the ball con ganas', or 'El ladrón se lanzó contra su víctima, y le golpeó con ganas'.

    I think the ones I've given above should work in your context.

    O, como dice @pogomole, puedo decir "Hasta entonces".
    No, not really, either...

    This one is a greeting. It is more relating to the email farewell, not to an expression in conversation...

    For this case, it'd be;
    I'd probably say "Quedo atento a su respuesta" (i.e. "I look forward to your reply")

    Alternatively, you could say "Quedo a la espera de..."
     
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