I love me some...

  • mgarizona

    Senior Member
    US - American English
    Just means "I love Brad Pitt"

    The construction is southern US, though used generally in 'ebonics'.

    The "me" is ultimately reflexive, like "J'aime Brad Pitt, moi."

    For some reason I associate the phrase with food: "I love me some corn bread." Perhaps the implication is the speaker considers Brad Pitt "good enough to eat."
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    The construction is southern US, though used generally in 'ebonics'.
    Twelve years later, I would say this has passed into general AE colloquial speech--not limited to speakers from any region or AAVE-speakers.

    It also can be used for things or activities, not just for people.

    I love me some home cooking!
    I love me some good bluegrass music!
     

    ForeverHis

    Senior Member
    American English
    Twelve years later, I would say this has passed into general AE colloquial speech--not limited to speakers from any region or AAVE-speakers.
    Wow, that's surprising! I wouldn't have understood that usage without this thread. (Thanks guys.) I wouldn't encourage it for those who are new to the English language, unless it's common in their milieu.
     

    Pedro y La Torre

    Senior Member
    English (Dublin, Ireland)
    Just to add that saying 'me' instead of 'my' is incorrect but very common in colloquial British, Irish and Australian English; for example, "I love me new car".
     

    broglet

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Warning! I have never heard this construction used by a BE speaker and until today I would not have had the foggiest clue what it meant!
     

    enattente

    Senior Member
    French & English; Ontario, Canada
    It spreading outside of certain AE dialects is pretty recent. I first noticed it in Canada with the verb "get": "I'm gonna get me something good for dinner tonight." But maybe that is a bit different because there it replaces "myself", whereas with "love me some" it is just an addition.

    It comes off as pretty "cutesy" and not always in a good way, since (to my ears) it is most associated with Black varieties of AE and can be seen as parodying, depending on the context. Probably by the time it is being discussed on forums like this it will also sound a bit out of date as well.
     

    wildan1

    Moderando ma non troppo (French-English, CC Mod)
    English - USA
    it is most associated with Black varieties of AE
    That may have been true... 15-20 years ago, but no longer the case.

    It's now used more broadly than in the African-American community, always in a very informal, colloquial way--and probably more common among Millenials and younger.
     
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