I love [the restaurants] [restaurants] in my hometown

dark.resurrection

Senior Member
Farsi
Hello
Imagine someone has asked you this question, "what do you like about your hometown?"
should I say "I love the restaurants in my hometown." OR "I love restaurants there."
I think the first one sounds more natural, but what keeps coming in my mind is that aren't we talking about "restaurants" in general and not a number of restaurants?
 
  • dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    I would definitely say "the restaurants." You're talking about specific ones (the ones in your hometown).
    So I should say I love the people there? makes sense, but why don't we say "in the European countries people live like this..." ? we almost always say in European countries people live like this" can you introduce any source that can help on article "the" ?
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So I should say I love the people there? makes sense, but why don't we say "in the European countries people live like this..." ? we almost always say in European countries people live like this" can you introduce any source that can help on article "the" ?
    Well, we'd probably say "in Europe, people..." "I love the people there" would mean that you love all or most of the people there; "I love people there" might mean there are three or four people who live there who you happen to love.
     

    dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    Well, we'd probably say "in Europe, people..." "I love the people there" would mean that you love all or most of the people there; "I love people there" might mean there are three or four people who live there who you happen to love.
    So I should say I love the restaurants in my hometown and I love people who live there? That is the part that I can't understand, we are talking about the restaurants in my hometown, and we are talking about people who live in my hometown
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    So I should say I love the restaurants in my hometown and I love people who live there? That is the part that I can't understand, we are talking about the restaurants in my hometown, and we are talking about people who live in my hometown
    It depends. Do you love "the people" there in general, or just certain "people"?
     

    dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    So you love the people there, then.
    Oh my...do you happen to have a shotgun or something? I am literally tearing my hair out now, this is contrary to what I have learned. When we say nurses are kind that means all nurses are kind, and when we say the nurses are kind we refer to a number of nurses, but this.... :confused::confused::confused:
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    Oh my...do you happen to have a shotgun or something? I am literally tearing my hair out now, this is contrary to what I have learned. When we say nurses are kind that means all nurses are kind, and when we say the nurses are kind we refer to a number of nurses, but this.... :confused::confused::confused:
    "I love people" refers to everyone, everywhere.
    "I love the people in London" means everyone (more or less) who lives in London.
    "I love people in London" (not a sentence we'd be likely to use) means there are some certain people in London that I love. It leaves it up in the air whether it's a lot of people or a small number.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    When we say nurses are kind that means all nurses are kind, and when we say the nurses are kind we refer to a number of nurses
    It's different. "Nurses are kind." But, "The nurses in this hospital are kind."

    "I love people in London" (not a sentence we'd be likely to use) means there are some certain people in London that I love. It leaves it up in the air whether it's a lot of people or a small number.
    However, when it comes to all people living in a country/city, the range becomes broader, and I thought that "people" could mean the same as "the people" in such context. Am I wrong?..
     

    The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    [...]However, when it comes to all people living in a country/city, the range becomes broader, and I thought that "people" could mean the same as "the people" in such context. Am I wrong?..
    In some cases it can mean essentially the same thing: People in London are nice ... The people in London are nice...
     

    dark.resurrection

    Senior Member
    Farsi
    "I love people" refers to everyone, everywhere.
    "I love the people in London" means everyone (more or less) who lives in London.
    "I love people in London" (not a sentence we'd be likely to use) means there are some certain people in London that I love. It leaves it up in the air whether it's a lot of people or a small number.
    Now I get it, Interesting! I don't know how to thank you, The Newt! I can't thank you enough!
     
    I would definitely say "the restaurants." You're talking about specific ones (the ones in your hometown).
    Newt's explained it well, thoroughly, in seven posts. I agree 'the' is needed.

    The apparent anomaly is that

    Restaurants in my hometown are great means the same as The restaurants in my hometown are great.

    Similar to what Newt said in post #12.
     
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