I love you (a family member)

bad_luck777

New Member
U.S.A, English
Allright, I'm writing a story for my Creative Writing class, and my main character is of German descent, BUT her grandmother speaks German at points in the story for emphasis. Within my story, the grandmother (or Oma) says I love you to my main character.

As a German student, myself, I know that ich liebe dich means I love you, BUT do you only say "Ich liebe dich" to your significant other? Or can you say it to your grandmother?

I also learned a phrase from my friend who has family from southern Germany and she says one can say " I mog di' " to a lover, but it means "I want you" and is used for lustful purposes. If this is the case, I'm going to stay away from I mog di', because they are family members, not lovers.

Since I'm unsure how my main character will say "I love you" to her Grandmother, I'd greatly appreciate your help on the correct way to say it (to your family member which is also elder) And I don't want to be wrong and end up using the wrong form of "I love you".

If it helps, in my story, the grandmother is VERY close to the main character, being her guardian and last surviving family member.

Thanks for your help :)
 
  • Reigh

    Senior Member
    German, Germany
    At least for me, "Ich liebe Dich" sounds terribly out of place for your purposes. I'd say "Ich hab' Dich lieb" is the natural way to say "I love you" to a family member and I hope everyone else agrees because I always thought "Ich liebe Dich" used in a family was just a bad German translation in American sitcoms. My apologies if "Ich liebe Dich" is really used in some German families, I don't mean to offend you :)
     

    heidita

    Banned
    Germany (German, English, Spanish)
    bad luck, welcome to the forum!

    So, your grandmother says"I love you" in German?

    Do not put "Ich liebe dich" into her moth, as Reigh says, we do not use this formula in German unless for a relationship with a man/woman.

    We would say:

    Ich habe dich lieb.
    Ich habe dich gern.
     

    bh7

    Senior Member
    Canada; English
    Ich stimme beiden vorangegangenen Beiträgen zu.
    I mog di', i hob di' so richti' gern, i han di gern, i hob di' liab, du taugst ma etc. would be used in this context by dialect speakers from Bavaria or Austria. The meaning of "i mog di" is exactly the same as the one of its standard German equivalent "ich mag dich". "Mögen" = schätzen, gern haben, lieben, sich hingezogen fühlen, wohlwollen, gut gesinnt sein. No need to fret about hidden sexual messages when grandma says it to her grandchild. The only question is, is grandma from that language area of Germany? Else, it wouldn't make sense for her to suddenly speak Bavarian dialect.
     

    bad_luck777

    New Member
    U.S.A, English
    Thank you so much guys for your help

    :)

    And thanks for teaching me Bavarian Dialekt, I'm actually not quite sure yet if I'm going to make Oma from Bavaria or not
    (the Oma in the story is loosly based off of my own Grandma, and she traced our roots to Bavaria, but that might be over kill)

    Thanks again for your help, I greatly appreciated it

    viel dank!!
     

    Voxy

    Senior Member
    Deutschland, deutsch
    Thank you so much guys for your help

    :)

    And thanks for teaching me Bavarian Dialekt, I'm actually not quite sure yet if I'm going to make Oma from Bavaria or not
    (the Oma in the story is loosly based off of my own Grandma, and she traced our roots to Bavaria, but that might be over kill)

    Thanks again for your help, I greatly appreciated it

    viel dank!!
    Hi,

    advise from a wise man: strictly stay away from German dialects, unless
    you're pretty sure what you want to express. ;) Did I mention to
    avoid German dialects? It is merely a trap I can tell you. And you can avoid it. ;)

    Voxy
     
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