I love you / I like you

  • trackstar1506

    New Member
    America, English
    actually its more of Je t'adore. Je t'aime is I like you. Which if its your boyfriend, is probably the thing you should be saying anyways.
     

    VenusEnvy

    Senior Member
    English, United States
    trackstar1506 said:
    actually its more of Je t'adore. Je t'aime is I like you.
    Je t'aime translates to "I love you". While the literal translation is not right on target, it carries the same meaning. […]
    traskstar said:
    Which if its your boyfriend, is probably the thing you should be saying anyways.
    What's up with this comment?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    trackstar1506

    New Member
    America, English
    Sorry about that, it was more of a comment towards my friends than anyone on here. I am tired of all of my friends who have been dating for about a month saying "I love you". and acting like the world would end if they broke up. Just a little frustration, sorry once again.
     

    Erys

    New Member
    Scotland, English
    I used to be confused about this - however I asked my french friend and she said:

    'aimer' can mean 'to like' when used for things, rather than people. Je t'aime when said to a person usually means 'I love you'...but you would say 'Je t'adore' to your parent/good friend/sibling. Je t'aime said to someone whom you're not romantically in love with means 'I like you'.

    It's all a lot fuzzier than that, I think. Hope that was clear.
     

    Cath.S.

    Senior Member
    français de France
    Je t'aime said to someone whom you're not romantically in love with means 'I like you'.
    We French never say je t'aime to someone we're not extremely close to, Erys, - not unless we're lying, of course.

    I like you = je t'aime bien / je t'adore
    I love you = je t'aime

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    Nath0811

    Senior Member
    France - Français
    Egueule tu me sors les mots de la bouche.

    We never say je t'aime like English-speaking people say I love you. Je t'aime alone is really to your significant other - and perhaps (hopefully) to your sibblings, parents and children.

    For the regular, affectionate I love you, like Egueule suggested, you say je t'aime bien, je t'aime beaucoup, or in slang je te kiffe! ;)

    Ps I was really surprised the day one of my co-worker told me I love you - I thought she had a crush on me or something!! :D Easier said in English than in French.
     

    bryona

    New Member
    USA, English
    egueule said:
    We French never say je t'aime to someone we're not extremely close to, Erys, - not unless we're lying, of course.

    I like you = je t'aime bien / je t'adore
    I love you = je t'aime

    You can say "Je t'adore" for I like you? I thought "adorer" was reserved for romance. I checked the other related threads, and I don't see another reference to "adorer" being used this way. (Maybe I wasn't reading carefully enough...)
     

    Hello

    Senior Member
    English
    How do you tell someone you like them...? If i say je t'aime, that seems as if it is in a love kind of way when i just want to say i like you... i hang round you becaus i like you... that kind of contex!!! but it happens to be to a male, so i dont want there to be any confusion!!!
     

    scriptis

    Senior Member
    Switzerland - French
    To your girlfriend, you say I love you = je t'aime

    to a friend you say I like you = je t'aime bien or je t'apprécie beaucoup
     

    fungetwanger

    Senior Member
    English, England
    hello! i really dont know why i havent joined these forums earlier, i have so many questions and no one to ask!
    i dont understand how to differentiate like and love in french.
    aimer = to like, yeh?
    but je t'aime = i love you

    so for example how do you know when someones saying they like someone, or they love someone
    eg
    "i like him, hes a nice enough lad, but i dont think i love him, and im certainly not in love with him"

    and is therefore, "to be in love" (which in my eyes, in english, is very different from just "to love") = être amoureux de qqn
    and where does adorer come into it?
    and is aimer bien = like a lot... it all looks pretty simple when ur just talking about objects but becomes important when u start talking about people!

    thankyou

    […]
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Hello:
    I'm really sorry I can't help much since my French is limited.

    But I do know that ( from my French friend ) when you say" Je t'aime beaucoup" It means I love you a lot, but as a friend only:eek: . It really shocked me when my friend first explained this to me, because if he didn't tell me that, I would have thought that it means " I love you deeply ( in a romantic way ) "

    Cheers,N
     

    scandalously in love

    Senior Member
    Canada - English
    Me too, I'm not a native speaker... but this is what I think:


    je t'aime = I love you (very strong, but may or may not be romantic. )

    je t'aime beaucoup = I love you a lot (same, but slightly less strong... it's like the more qualifying words you add on to je t'aime, the less impact it has...)

    (both these sentences, just like in english, could be romantic or not. A child could for instance say it to his parents. However, I think that if a guy said this to a girl, you would take it in a romantic sense.)

    je t'aime bien = I like you (a lot) (in a friendship, caring kind of way)
    je t'aime fort

    adorer = I think this is just a expression to stress the extreme, as is used more with generalizations, rather than a specific person.

    ie. j'adore le chocolat. J'adore les chats.

    edit: after scanning previous posts, you can also use adorer in connection with a person, but its still not as strong as je t'aime.


    For your sample sentence, I think you would write:

    Je l'aime bien, il est très sympa, mais je ne pense pas que je suis amoreuse de lui.

    But I don't know how you would say "love him" without awkwardly repeating "aime" twice...

    Please someone correct my errors! :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    pepenounours

    New Member
    Italiano, Europe
    Quote:
    You can say "Je t'adore" for I like you?
    Yes you can, but be careful, an American might reply "Shut the door yourself!" :)

    But aside from this is there an expression in Fench like: "Je te vieux bien." equivalent to (Italian: "Ti voglio bene.") I thought I had heard or read that a while ago.
    pepenounours
    pepenounours
     

    **ellie**

    Senior Member
    Italian-Italy
    I doubt "je te veux bien" exists, I asked it lots of times to some french friends and they all said it doesn't exist! I think you can just say, Je t'aime bien, or maybe, what the french form for : I care of you..?
     

    danfitzgerald

    New Member
    United States
    I need to add "I love you" in French into a new song. I first used "Je t'aime" then ran across "Je vous aime." Is it okay to have the singer sing "Je vous aime" ??

    Thanks.
     

    Fragga

    Senior Member
    Francais France
    It's okay, but it's more "poetic", you wouldn't use the polite form to tell to someone that you love him/her. Of course if he loves more than one person "je vous aime" is what you should use.
     

    bernik

    Senior Member
    Brittany - french
    trackstar1506: " actually its more of Je t'adore. Je t'aime is I like you "

    I think "I love you" can be translated as both je t'aime or je t'adore, depending on the context.
    je t'adore = I love you, you are great, you are a darling
    je vous aime = I love you, will you marry me ?

    But "je vous aime" is mainly used in poems and recent songs. You rarely say "I love you" or "je t'aime" to the person you love, except if you say it in a foreign language. However, if you are English, and in the process of hugging your girlfriend, I think you can say "Hmm! I looooove you!", very much as you would say: "Hmm! I looooove that onion soup !". In that case, the equivalent french expression will not do. The problem is that you cannot put as much accentuation in "aime" as in "love". It is always a short vowel in "aime", and you can not stretch it out. So you have to find other verbs. Like adorer, for example: hmm! ch't'adoooore !

    Sometimes, it may happen that a man will make a "déclaration d'amour" to a young girl who was not aware that he was romantically interested in her. In that case, he will probably say something like: Vous ne semblez pas avoir remarqué mon existence, mais je voulais vous dire que je vous aime et que je n'ai d'yeux que pour vous. Pourrais-je vous inviter au restaurant lundi prochain ? (The girl will probably run away).

    But if a man is already with his girlfriend and wants to take things to the next level and express his "love", he will find something better to say than "je t'aime" or "I love you", which is awkward and ridiculous.
     

    KaRiNe_Fr

    Senior Member
    Français, French - France
    OlivierG said:
    Well, I just learnt that saying "Je t'aime" to the man/woman you're in love with is awkward and ridiculous. :eek:
    I'll take care, from now :D
    Oui, moi aussi, je le note. Il doit sûrement falloir dire "je te kiffe trop grave" plutôt maintenant... :rolleyes:
     

    ilovemeret

    New Member
    Us and English
    hey, i am trying to find out how to say "i really like you" but all the translator says is "i really love you"

    i was wondering if there was a way to say that you like someone

    please help this is urgent i appreciate it!
     

    tilt

    Senior Member
    French French
    I like you = je t'aime bien.
    I really like you = je t'aime vraiment bien or je t'aime beaucoup.

    Several threads already exist about this question on this forum.
     

    Little Cookie

    New Member
    France
    Hi everybody!

    My best friend (American) think that French language has not a word to say "I love you". Even with my explanations, he still has trouble with that. It's true, we use "je t'aime" for many things, not just for people, even to tell we appreciate cheese or a books... Unfornately, we don't have the word "like", but of course, I can't be agree with him. Je ne peux pas cautionner une telle chose. C'est comme dire que nous ne sommes pas capable de dire "je t'aime" et de réellement le penser.
    I'd like to know what other people (not French of course) are thinking about this, did you are the same feeling?
    Bien sûr, j'aimerais aussi savoir ce que les français pensent de ceci: "que nous n'avons pas de mot pour dire ' je t'aime' "
    I thank everybody by advance.
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Hmmm, I always made the distinction between "je t'aime bien" - I like you and "je t'aime" - I love you. I might be wrong, but that's the way I've been seeing it for a long time :D
     

    delfos90

    Senior Member
    Mexico, Español
    Well I`ll Try to be somehow helpful, First i'm Mexican and I had had that kind of disscussion with an american friend. I used to tell him that there are two menanings for the verb To be, at least in spanish, I'm here is not the same than I'm Adrian. Or, there's not a word to distiguish a friend of yours who is male or female, and stuff like that. But the conclusion I got about this is that Context and non-oral language give you all the information you need to get the real meanning of a word. So It's not the same to tell Je t'aime to your best friend than to a Girlfriend or your mother.
    I hope it helps you to beat his arguments.
    Au revoir mon amie

    Thanks for forgiving and correcting my misspellings ;)
     

    Mezzofanti

    Senior Member
    Native speaker of pukka UK English
    Even in English "love your wife", "love your neighbour" and "love your dog" use a single word to identify a kind of affection which is unlikely to be the same in each case. The English word "love" covers a number of loosely analogous realities. The French word "aimer" covers a slightly largely number. French-speakers, like English-speakers, rely on intonation, body language, metaphors, variations and context to make it clear which kind of aimer they mean. They have no difficulty communicating the message "I love you" without ambiguity. It's "Je t'AIME !"
     

    Little Cookie

    New Member
    France
    I thank you very much Trisia, you're right!!!
    But the conclusion I got about this is that Context and non-oral language give you all the information you need to get the real meanning of a word. So It's not the same to tell Je t'aime to your best friend than to a Girlfriend or your mother. (from delfos90) I'm complately agree with you! English language has just one word to say "friend". In French, we have "copain et ami" wich are different. So, I ask me how people are doing to make this difference. But I guess, it's like "I like and I love". Usually, we are able to make the difference, to understand what the other is thinking.
    Even in English "love your wife", "love your neighbour" and "love your dog" use a single word to identify a kind of affection which is unlikely to be the same in each case. Yes, I already heard that. The English word "love" covers a number of loosely analogous realities. The French word "aimer" covers a slightly largely number. French-speakers, like English-speakers, rely on intonation, body language, metaphors, variations and context to make it clear which kind of aimer they mean. They have no difficulty communicating the message "I love you" without ambiguity. It's "Je t'AIME !" Well, I'm really glad to hear this! But the problem still, when you are writing on a computer, no voice, no face, no body to help you and to translate some feelings in another language, sometimes, it's pretty hard. Oh well! our different language ; )
    I thank you all for your respond.
     

    Suehil

    Medemod
    British English
    In English the word 'love' can be used just as widely as in French: "I simply love chocolate", "I love it when it's sunny", "I love to go for long walks", "I love nature", "I love the way you say that"
    And still "I love you" means the same thing as "Je t'aime"
     

    nichec

    Senior Member
    Chinese(Taiwan)
    Hmmm, I always made the distinction between "je t'aime bien" - I like you and "je t'aime" - I love you. I might be wrong, but that's the way I've been seeing it for a long time :D

    This is the same as "Je t'aime beaucoup".

    Another one, I don't think you say "Je te vraiment aime" to people other than your lovers, right? :confused:
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I don't know about lovers, but I'd use it in other contexts, too:

    "Je t'aime vraiment, maman!" - she just gave me permission to go on a field trip.

    "Je t'aime vraiment, t'est la meilleure" - to my best friend that just graduated top of her class.

    "Je t'aime vraiment, tu le sais" - to a friend that's depressed.

    "Je t'aime vraiment, Nichec. Tes messages sont super!"

    The list can go on :D
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    « Adorer » se traduit meilleur comme to love, puisque c'est plus intense qu'un simple « aimer ».
     

    Outsider

    Senior Member
    Portuguese (Portugal)
    Ça dépend. En général, oui. Mais si l'on parle d'amour, alors « Je t'aime » est plus intense que « Je t'adore », je crois.
     

    Crescent

    Senior Member
    Russian, (Ukraine)
    En fait, je dois avouer que cela me fait très bizarre aussi, que ''adorer'' est pus intense avec les objets, les choses inanimes, qu'avec les gens! :eek: Je n'ai jamais compris pourquoi, mais je sais que dire 'Je t'aime'' est plus intense que 'Je t'adore'', car ''adorer' dans ce cas-ci est presque comme..quelque chose de mignon, de doux, mais pas un 'feu ardent' qu'on éprouve souvent en aimant, si j'ai bien compris. :)
     

    Little Cookie

    New Member
    France
    Je suis entièrement d'accord avec toi Outsider en ce qui concerne "friend" et bien sûr sur le mot "adorer" que nous utilisons malheureusement à toutes les sauces, un peu comme "aimer".
    Lorsqu'on aime réellement une personne, on lui dit "je t'aime" sans ajouter quoi que ce soit. C'est ce qu'il y a de plus fort et de plus intense.
    Mais heureusement que l'amour ne se limite pas qu'à un seul mot, se serait bien triste. Merci infiniment pour toutes vos réponses :)
     

    DerDrache

    Banned
    English/US
    I like you vs I love you

    What would be the best translations of each of these? I've always thought that it was "je t'aime" for both, but that you'd be able to tell the difference from context. Is that right, or...no?
     
    Last edited by a moderator:

    weepingwillow29

    New Member
    United States and English
    so i have no clue how to differentiate between
    "i like you" - as a friend
    "i really like you"- as more than a friend
    "i love you/ i am in love with you" - romantically
    "i love you"- family/friends

    I have read some other threads yet am still confused after them all. Could anyone clarify please?
     

    weepingwillow29

    New Member
    United States and English
    Yes, in French. Sorry that was not clear.

    "je t'adore" is this stronger than je t'aime? i read much debate.
    "je t'aime" romantically yes?
    "je t'aime bien" is this for family and friends?
    "je te kiffe" i have a crush on you, correct?
    how would you say that you liked really liked someone, not as strongly as love but more than a friend??
     

    Xavier11222

    Senior Member
    France French
    All correct.

    [Earlier in this thread] "je t'aime beaucoup" is compared to "I like you a whole lot", which is stronger than "I like you" but not as scarily committing as the L word. Maybe that's what you're looking for.
     
    Last edited by a moderator:
    Top