I lucked into three empty seats on the flight over.

nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
I lucked into three empty seats on the flight over.
[Topic sentence added to post DonnyB - moderator]


What does "flight over" mean here?

This is an example sentence of the phrase "luck into something."

source: luck into something
 
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  • nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    This is something a person would say when they have arrived at their destination.

    "On the flight over [here], I lucked into three empty seats."

    Had no idea "on the flight over" can mean that! thanks.

    Can it be modified like "on one's way here/there"?

    ie) On the flight over [there], I slept through the whole time.
     

    anthox

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Had no idea "on the flight over" can mean that! thanks.

    Can it be modified like "on one's way here/there"?

    ie) On the flight over [there], I slept through the whole time.
    Yes, you know, the more I think about the expression, it can also be used to refer to a remote destination ("there"). It's just, "on the flight over [to wherever I was going]."
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "The flight over" is a reference to the journey. "Over" means you have flown over the ground or the water to get from one place to the other place. Another way to look at it is you have changed horizontal positions on the face of the earth. You have moved over, by flying.

    "Here" or "there" is independent of that and depends on where you are now, who you are talking to, and where they are.

    If you fly to London and someone meets you at the airport, you can talk to them about the flight over (here).

    - The flight over (to get here) went smoothly.

    If you return home and talk about your trip to a friend, you can refer to it as the flight over (there).

    - The flight over (to get there) went smoothly.
     
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