I`m hastening to notarize you that everything is ok.

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salai

Senior Member
Russian
can Hello,

These are the lines from my student's home assignment:

'I have just recieved you email and I`m hastening to notarize you that everything is ok.'

The idea is clear to me, but the choice of words in the second part is wrong.

Is it possible to change the second part into:

'I assure you that everything is OK.'?

It is just that I do not know how to render the idea that I am in hurry to do that.

I would appreciate your opinion on that.

Thank you for the time and help.

 
Last edited:
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    1. "Notarize" is obviously is out of place.

    2. It makes no sense to use the present tense to say you're sending a message if that information is contained in the message that won't be read until a later time.

    3. Try: "I'm OK. I replied as fast as I could."
     

    salai

    Senior Member
    Russian
    I do know the difference between 'notarize' and 'notify'.
    What I would like to find out is what English phrase can be used to point out that the person is in a hurry to notify/inform the other one that the problems have been solved. The student wrote 'I am hastening' thinking in Russian. There is quite a formal construction in Russian which, if translated word-for-word into English. sounds like 'I'm in a hurry to notify/inform you.' I have never come across one in English though, so that is the reason for my question.
    "Notarize" doesn't mean what you think it does, salai. (Look it up.) The word is "notify."
    Sdg's advice is right on.
     
    Last edited:

    cyberpedant

    Senior Member
    English USA, Northeast, NYC
    My apologies, salai. I should have said "what your student thinks it does." What we would say would be something like: Here's a quick note to let you know I'm OK."
     

    salai

    Senior Member
    Russian
    No hard feelings at all. I learn just as my students do.
    Just on the contrary, thank you very much indeed.
    I always upload corrected assignments of my students, with replies from native speakers, on their web page.
     

    Parla

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    I have just recieved received your e-mail, and I'm hastening to notarize notify you that everything is ok. okay.
    Not only the second part of your student's sentence is incorrect; there are errors in the first part as well. It can be corrected while still retaining the student's format, as I've indicated; there's no need to change to a completely different form of expression.

    "Advise" would be a better choice than "notify", although the latter isn't incorrect.
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Not only the second part of your student's sentence is incorrect; there are errors in the first part as well.
    Perhaps, but "ok" is not one of them. The expression as originally written was O.K., not "okay", and o.k/ok remains correct; okay is a later phonetic representation of the two-letter abbreviation.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I note that Parla has crossed out ok and replaced it by okay. OK, in capitals, was in the first 3 dictionaries I looked at, but then okay is correct as well... OK? :eek:

    GF..

    Just to let you know.... that everything is OK. Okay?
     
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    salai

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Hello Parla,

    I overlooked the spelling mistakes you mentioned accidentally on purpose. What caught my eye right away was 'hasten to notarize', and I posted my question. My intention is to leave the letter the way it is, I mean spelling, so that we can use it and dozen others when we have a period in the computer lab, usually once a week. I use an online writeboard and the whole group can see the mistakes on their screens and correct them.
    Not only the second part of your student's sentence is incorrect; there are errors in the first part as well. It can be corrected while still retaining the student's format, as I've indicated; there's no need to change to a completely different form of expression.

    "Advise" would be a better choice than "notify", although the latter isn't incorrect.
     
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