I miss you

ellas!

Member
England, English
Sorry if this has been done before but I looked quickly and couldn't find one.

So... In any language you know- I miss you or I'll miss you (or both)



Thanks :)
 
  • Bienvenidos

    Senior Member
    USA
    Afghanistan/USA
    Spanish: Te extraño
    Farsi: Muh pushtit dict shudaym
    Muh pushtit zyot hufuh shudaym.
    Dict darum.

    Bien

    Bien
     

    ShroomS

    Member
    Philippines/Tagalog
    In Tagalog, you can say it in more ways than one:

    (slang) Miss kita.

    (formal) Nangungulila ako sa iyo.

    OR Ako'y nangungulila sa iyo.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    "I miss you" has not been done before but "I'll miss you" has. Please limit your posts in this thread to translations of the former, and use the other thread for translations of the latter.

    "I miss you" in Arabic:

    *If the speaker is a male,...

    ...and is speaking to one person: إني مشتاق إليك (inni mushtaaqun ilaykaa - if "you" is masculine; inni mushtaaqun ilaykii - if "you" is feminine)
    ...and is speaking to two people: إني مشتاق إليكما (inni mushtaaqun ilaykumaa)
    ...and is speaking to a group of three or more people, at least one of whom is male: إني مشتاق إليكم (inni mushtaaqun ilaykum)
    ...and is speaking to a group of three or more females: أني مشتاق إليكن (inni mushtaaqun ilaykunna)

    *If the speaker is a female,...

    ...and is speaking to one person: إني مشتاقة إليك (inni mushtaaqatun ilaykaa - if "you" is masculine; inni mushtaaqun ilaykii - if "you" is feminine)
    ...and is speaking to two people: إني مشتاقة إليكما (inni mushtaaqatun ilaykumaa)
    ...and is speaking to a group of three or more people, at least one of whom is male: إني مشتاقة إليكم (inni mushtaaqatun ilaykum)
    ...and is speaking to a group of three or more females: أني مشتاقة إليكن (inni mushtaaqatun ilaykunna)
     

    crises

    Senior Member
    BCN
    EU Spanish/Catalan
    In Catalan: "Et trobo a faltar".

    About Spanish: in European Spanish the common expression is "Echar de menos" ("Te echo de menos") but in America people say "Extrañar" ("Te extraño").
     

    Maja

    Senior Member
    Serbian, Serbia
    In Serbian:

    Sg.
    I miss you - "Nedostaješ mi" (Cyrillic - Недостајеш ми)
    I will miss you - "Nedostajaćeš mi" (Cyrillic - Недостајaћеш ми)

    Pl. and formal address
    I miss you - "Nedostajete mi" (Cyrillic - Недостајете ми)
    I will miss you - "Nedostajaćete mi" (Cyrillic - Недостајaћете ми)

    Greetings (Pozdrav)!
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    French:

    Tu me manques/Vous me manquez (first one is familiar address, second is formal)

    Hindi/Urdu:

    Mujhe uss ki (bahaat) yaadi aatee hai
    (hmm.. maybe there's a shorter way of saying that!)
    literally, it means: "The thoughts of him/her come to me (a lot)" (it's impersonal in Hindi)

    Alternatively: "Mai unko yaad kartaa hoon" ("I remember him/her a lot)

    Gujarati:

    (following the Hindi style..!)

    Manay enee bo yaadi aavay che
    /Oo ene bo yaad karoo choon
     

    larosa

    Member
    Hungary, Hungarian
    In Hungarian

    I miss you = Hiányzol / Hiányoztok (pl.)
    I will miss you = Hiányozni fogsz / Hiányozni fogtok (pl.)
     

    macta123

    Senior Member
    India,Hindi
    In Hindi
    I miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz kar rahan hoon
    I will miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz karoonga
     

    linguist786

    Senior Member
    English, Gujarati & Urdu
    macta123 said:
    In Hindi
    I miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz kar rahan hoon
    I will miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz karoonga
    cool.. good alternative..
    Isn't there like a really short way of saying it?
    Literally that means "I am feeling your absence"
    hmm.. interesting.

    oh by the way, if it's a female speaker, it'd be changed slightly to:
    I miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz kar rahee hoon
    I will miss you = Mein tumhari kami mahsooz karoongee
    ;)
     

    cherine

    Moderator
    Arabic (Egypt).
    Sorry for coming in so late :)
    Josh Adkins said:
    In Egyptian colloquial Arabic you can say:
    waHishni (to a male)
    waHshaani (to a female)
    waHshenni (to a group of people)
    These are verbs in present tense.

    Also in Egyptian colloquial Arabic, people can sometimes use the past tense to express the same meaning (I miss you) :
    waHashteni (to a male)
    waHashtini (to a female)
    waHashtuuni (to a group of people)
     

    phantomkiss

    New Member
    Sweden, Swedish / Ireland, English
    Saw that this wasn't there so:

    Swedish: "Jag saknar dig" or, if it's to somone you know well, you can simply say "Saknar dig" (as in "Miss You")

    :)
     

    andreiro

    New Member
    Romanian
    Romanian:

    If you speak to one person:
    I miss you="Îmi lipseşti" or "Mi-e dor de tine"
    I'll miss you="O să-mi lipseşti" or "O să-mi fie dor de tine" (informal, widely used)
    "Îmi vei lipsi" or "Îmi va fi dor de tine" (formal, rarely used in speech).

    If you speak to more people:
    I miss you="Îmi lipsiţi" or "Mi-e dor de voi"
    I'll miss you="O să-mi lipsiţi" or "O să-mi fie dor de voi" (informal)
    "Îmi veţi lipsi" or "Îmi va fi dor de voi" (formal)
     

    Pivra

    Senior Member
    ...
    Thai: (phonetically)
    Rao kidtheung ter na' -ka or -krab (-ka is for female speakers, -krab is for male speakers)

    Isan Thai: Ai kudhod tua ner' (-ka or -krab )

    Laotian:

    Khoi kuedhod chao de
     

    mae

    Member
    Basque&Spanish-Spain
    More Basque...

    Faltan zaitut
    The object zu (you) drops...as well as the subject nik (I).
     

    an_indonesian_in_winnipeg

    New Member
    Indonesian and Indonesia
    Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian) for I miss you
    Saya rindu kamu
    Saya kangen kamu
    Aku rindu kamu
    Aku kangen kamu

    for I'll miss you
    saya akan merindukanmu
    aku akan merindukanmu
     

    Kotrab

    New Member
    Scotland | English
    Scottish Gaelic

    I miss you
    Tha mi gad ionndrainn (informal) or Tha mi gur ionndrainn (formal)

    I will miss you
    Bidh mi gad ionndrainn (informal) or Bidh mi gur ionndrainn (formal)

    Kotrab
     

    ksiusha

    New Member
    russian, romenia Moldavia
    hey, hi..
    it's a bit late , but nobody had written in russian,
    so i thought it gonna be nice-" ia po tebe skuciaiu"
    best wishes:)
     

    maud

    Senior Member
    French(Canada)
    In Japanese I think that it is:
    あなたがいなくて寂しいです。
    Anataga inakute sabishii desu.


    (by the way could someone please tell me what なくて means here ?)
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    maud said:
    In Japanese I think that it is:
    あなたがいなくて寂しいです。
    Anataga inakute sabishii desu.


    (by the way could someone please tell me what なくて means here ?)
    inakute: "as [you are] not present" from "inai", negative from of "iru" (exist, for humans).

    In a romantic context, a more stronger adjective seem to be handy:
    あなたが恋しいです。
    anata-ga koishī desu.

    The adjective koishī expresses strong disatisfaction for the absence of the person or the object referred to. It was more frequently used a generation or two ago but, nowadays, its domain seems to be restricted to romance and love affairs.

    Flam
     

    ukuca

    Senior Member
    Turkish - Turkey
    In Turkish we generally say "Seni özledim" instead of "Seni özlüyorum".
    Both sentences are true, but first one is more common I think.
    "Seni özledim" is not actually in present tense (gramatically in past)
    but this sentence refers a present meaning in daily use.
     

    Sina

    New Member
    Turco, Turquia
    Turkish

    Özledim seni
    Seni mumla arar olduk
    Arattırdın kendini
    Hasretini çekiyorum

    And a song about this

    Orda bir köy var uzakta
    O köy bizim köyümüzdür
    Gitmesek de, görmesek de
    O köy bizim köyümüzdür.

    Means

    There is a village far away from here
    That is our village
    Since we dont go there and see there
    That is our village

    Or

    Este es un pueblo
    Lo es mis
    Nos no visitarlo, o verlo, pero
    Lo es mis pueblo.

    (im not sure about spanish one, my spanish isnt good)
     

    GenJen54

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    Hi Janniah,

    Welcome to the Forums! I have moved your thread from the Cultural Discussions forum to here in Other Languages, where you will receive many more replies.

    There is already a thread on this subject with 43 replies. You might want to look at it HERE.

    Good luck!
     
    I think you will find there is already a verrrrry long thread with "I miss you", and others with all kinds of typical things lovers like to say to eachother... I love you, I need you, kiss, etc... It's a good idea to do a search for threads like this first before opening up a new one... :)
     
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