I missed you

  • parakseno

    Senior Member
    Romanian, Romania
    I'd translate it as:

    Μου λείπεις (mu lipis). Actually, μου έλειψες (mu elipses) since you used past.
    Despina knows why :p.
     

    modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    I agree with parakseno's μου έλειψες. Σας έχασα means "I lost you" so I guess in some contexts it could mean "I missed you" but not in the usual sense.

    Whodunit said:
    Oops, I just realized that it should be "zaz echaza". "σ" and "ς" is the same letter. :eek:

    The "z" represents the pronunciation of soft "s" as in English "zebra".
    Acutally, Greek σ is never pronounced like "z" before a vowel (or between them). And another difference between Greek and German I've noticed is that the sound of Greek χ depends on the following vowel (so σας έχασα is [sas'exasa]), while in German it depends on the preceeding vowel, right?
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    modus.irrealis said:
    Acutally, Greek σ is never pronounced like "z" before a vowel (or between them).
    I'm not aware of the correct Greek pronunciation, but "z" was supposed to stand for a soft s as in zoo. Would you say that the sigma is pronounced like the"s" in so?

    And another difference between Greek and German I've noticed is that the sound of Greek χ depends on the following vowel (so σας έχασα is [sas'exasa]), while in German it depends on the preceeding vowel, right?
    Yes, it does, but ... which are the two allophones in Greek? How do you pronounce/distinguish them? In German it is [χ] (after a,o, u) and [ç] (after e, i, ä, ö, ü, and all consonants).
     

    modus.irrealis

    Senior Member
    English, Canada
    Whodunit said:
    I'm not aware of the correct Greek pronunciation, but "z" was supposed to stand for a soft s as in zoo. Would you say that the sigma is pronounced like the"s" in so?
    Before vowels, yes. Sigma is like "z" in zoo only before voiced consonants, so σεισμός is pronounced [sizmos].

    Yes, it does, but ... which are the two allophones in Greek? How do you pronounce/distinguish them? In German it is [χ] (after a,o, u) and [ç] (after e, i, ä, ö, ü, and all consonants).
    I've read that they're the same as in German. χ is [x] (my reference grammar uses this symbol, but I don't know if it differs from [χ]) in all cases except before ε, αι, ι, η, υ, οι, ει, where it's [ç].

    I remember taking German in university for my humanities requirement and I had problems with words like machen since my tongue just didn't want to say [x] before a front vowel. :D
     

    Whodunit

    Senior Member
    Deutschland ~ Deutsch/Sächsisch
    modus.irrealis said:
    Before vowels, yes. Sigma is like "z" in zoo only before voiced consonants, so σεισμός is pronounced [sizmos].
    That's interesting. I didn't even know that sigma can represent two different sounds.

    I've read that they're the same as in German. χ is [x] (my reference grammar uses this symbol, but I don't know if it differs from [χ]) in all cases except before ε, αι, ι, η, υ, οι, ει, where it's [ç].
    Same in German. FYI, [x] and [χ] are actually two different sounds, but most books use [x] only, unless there is [χ] in the same language (which I'd doubt), too. ;)

    I remember taking German in university for my humanities requirement and I had problems with words like machen since my tongue just didn't want to say [x] before a front vowel. :D
    I thought it would be much more complicated to say Eichhörnchen. :D
     

    janecito

    Senior Member
    Slovene, Slovenia
    modus.irrealis said:
    Before vowels, yes. Sigma is like "z" in zoo only before voiced consonants, so σεισμός is pronounced [sizmos].
    Wow, I didn't know that. I thought σ was pronounced as [z] only before [m] (μ) > κόσμος [kózmos], but looks like more voiced consonants (β, γ, δ, ζ, μ, ν, ρ). Had to check my Greek Grammar Book again. ;)

    My knowledge of Greek phonetics is still very poor, so I was trying to apply the Spanish one here. :) I thought that wouldn't be so bad as I find these two languages phonetically incredibly similar. In Spanish the only S pronounced as [z] is the one standing before M, unlike in most of the other Romance languages that know the sonorization of (single) S ([z]) in all intervocalic positions (it. casa, fr. maison).
     

    Zanos

    Senior Member
    janecito said:
    My knowledge of Greek phonetics is still very poor, so I was trying to apply the Spanish one here. :) I thought that wouldn't be so bad as I find these two languages phonetically incredibly similar.
    Greek and Spanish are really very similar(phonetically).I personally find it preety weird...
    "I missed you = Μου έλειψες" which would actually be "Μου 'λειψες.." which sounds like {moúlipses}
     
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