I must have it.

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jiris

Senior Member
English – American
I have no idea how to translate this without a verb "to have".

Kellem (?)... ? ....

Also, I note that in English "I must have it" is very strong, very emphatic. One doesn't often hear this said.
 
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  • jiris

    Senior Member
    English – American
    Sorry I forgot to add a context–– at least in English there is no context required for this sentence, I think it's pretty much always the same. But in case you need one:

    You see something in a shop window that you must have.
     

    jiris

    Senior Member
    English – American
    How about "Szükségem van arra" ?

    Though it's "I need that".
    Yeah that seems pretty good. Though the only this I should have noted in my original post (I'll edit it) is that in English to say "I must have it" is very strong, very emphatic. If possible I would like to find an equivalent in Hungarian.
     

    NagyKiss

    Senior Member
    How about "Ezt meg kell kapnom!"

    > Would it be also be okay to just say "Szükségem van." ?

    I'm not sure, since I, myself, just recently started studying Hungarian, but I think it's like saying in English "I need". Doesn't make much sense.
     

    gorilla

    Member
    Hungarian - Hungary
    Part of the problem is that we don't have "have" word, so we need to introduce a new verb. A general possibility is "megszerez" (get/obtain). It is ambiguous as to how you will get it (buy yourself, someone else buys, you steal it etc.)

    - "Ezt (mindenképp) meg kell szereznem!" / "Ezt muszáj megszereznem!" (I (absolutely) have to get/obtain this.)

    In case of the shopping window example, I think a more concrete sentence would be better:
    - "Ezt meg kell vennem!" / "Ezt muszáj megvennem!" (I have to buy this)

    "Szükségem van erre." doesn't have enough emphasis. It's simply a neutral "I need this" without much emotional content, like a robot talking.
     

    Zsanna

    ModErrata
    Hungarian - Hungary
    I have no idea how to translate this without a verb "to have".

    Kellem (?)... ? ....

    Also, I note that in English "I must have it" is very strong, very emphatic. One doesn't often hear this said.
    Aha, so it is not "to have" but must have (or have to have? Not a lucky example...:rolleyes: )!

    That is: kell. No conjugation, no difference between must and have to.

    E.g.
    I must have/have to have that book. = Kell (nekem) az a könyv.
    You " " " " " " = Kell neked az a könyv.
    He/she ..... = Kell neki az a könyv.

    etc.
     
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    jiris

    Senior Member
    English – American
    Okay, thanks for all your responses. It seems like using a more specific verb works well.

    "Ezt (mindenképp) meg kell szereznem!" / "Ezt muszáj megszereznem!"
    Kell (nekem) ....

    I am reading these over trying to get a sense for the relative intensity of the utterances. The first two seem quite strong, the construction with "kell" seems more regular, I would expect that it's more commonly used, but really I'm mostly guessing. Although the verb muszáj, I saw in the dictionary, has the sense of "being obliged" [by external forces, I assume] which isn't the sense I have in mind.

    What about this: Ezt kell birtokolnom
    Possession is really what I had in mind, "I must possess it"
     
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    Encolpius

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I must have it. Ez kell nekem.
    But without a concrete context it is hard to find the proper answer.
    I must have that hot girl. Az a szexi csaj kell nekem!
     

    francisgranada

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    I agree with Encolpius in the sense that "Ez kell nekem" is probably the expression that fits the Enlgish "I must have it" in most (many) cases. Depending on context, "Ezt meg kell vennem/kapnom/szereznem" or more strongly "Ezt muszáj megvennem/megszereznem/megkapnom" are of course also valid.

    What about this: Ezt kell birtokolnom
    Grammatically ok, but in this case the usage of birtokolni seems to be a bit "exaggerated" (to say so) ... (perhaps also in English using to possess instead of the "simple" to have ...)

    ... at least in English there is no context required for this sentence ...
    I am sorry, but this is an illusion :) ... (one usually doesn't feel the need of a context in one's own mother tongue).
     
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