I need a prescription from my doctor for it

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bamboo--tw

Senior Member
ROC/Mandarin
I can't buy this medicine in a store. I need a prescription from my doctor for it.


HI,
Is it correct to understand "for it" in the above as "for the purpose of getting it?" Thanks.
 
  • panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Not quite.
    The prescription is for the medicine, it is a prescription for aspirin, not a prescription for the purpose of procuring aspirin. The difference is marginal.
     

    bamboo--tw

    Senior Member
    ROC/Mandarin
    Not quite.
    The prescription is for the medicine, it is a prescription for aspirin, not a prescription for the purpose of procuring aspirin. The difference is marginal.
    Thanks, Panjandrum.
    Then, how would you interpret the for in "a prescription for aspirin?" Doesn't it mean "a prescription to get aspirin?"
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Yes, for most purposes it does mean a prescription to get asprin.

    (Panjo-mod's point is very <cough> subtle!)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    There are two (2) different meaings for "prescription for" in my opinion.

    The first is "what is written on the prescription form".

    Oh, I see you have a prescription. What is it for?

    In this case it means "What did the doctor specify on the prescription form?"


    In the second meaning is "what is the purpose of the prescription."

    The purpose is to buy aspirin. The prescription is for aspirin. (For the purpose of obtaining aspirin.)


    This post is a natural product. The slight variations in spelling and grammar enhance its individual character and beauty and in no way should be considered flaws or defects.
     
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