I need it a lot

  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Which verb are you asking about – need or love? They work differently.

    · I need it a lot :thumbsdown: · I often need it :thumbsup:
    · I need it very much :thumbsdown: · I really/badly need it :thumbsup:

    · I like this film very much :thumbsup:
    · I like this film a lot :thumbsup:
    · I love this film :thumbsup:
     

    green_muse

    Senior Member
    Russian, Armenian
    Which verb are you asking about – need or love? They work differently.

    · I need it a lot :thumbsdown: · I often need it :thumbsup:
    · I need it very much :thumbsdown: · I really/badly need it :thumbsup:

    · I like this film very much :thumbsup:
    · I like this film a lot :thumbsup:
    · I love this film :thumbsup:
    Both actually. My question is, can we use "a lot" instead of "very much" after verbs?
    As I see from your comment it only works with love but not need.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    ...
    Can we say "I need it a lot"? "A lot" instead of "very much".
    ...

    It is not idiomatic to say "I need it a lot" because it is ambiguous. It can mean "I need it often" or it can mean "I need it very much"

    My question is, can we use "a lot" instead of "very much" after verbs?
    What do you mean by "after verbs"? Immediately after a verb? After the verb but separated by other words?

    Can you use it? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Sometimes the substitution changes the meaning, sometimes it doesn't. There is no simple rule and the verb, the sentence structure, and the context make a difference to what is possible and what is meaningful.
     

    green_muse

    Senior Member
    Russian, Armenian
    It is not idiomatic to say "I need it a lot" because it is ambiguous. It can mean "I need it often" or it can mean "I need it very much"


    What do you mean by "after verbs"? Immediately after a verb? After the verb but separated by other words?

    Can you use it? Sometimes yes, sometimes no. Sometimes the substitution changes the meaning, sometimes it doesn't. There is no simple rule and the verb, the sentence structure, and the context make a difference to what is possible and what is meaningful.
    I mean immediately after the verb.
    I need this book very much/a lot. (I badly need it)
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I mean immediately after the verb.
    I need this book very much/a lot. (I badly need it)
    Again, neither of these are idiomatic - or they require context. "I need this book a lot" has several possible meanings:

    It could mean:
    1. I very often have to consult this book (maybe it is a text-book for your studies)
    2. I need this book very much (maybe you rarely use it, but it is very important)
    3. I don't have this book and I need it (maybe for my studies)

    Idiomatic

    I badly need this book (I don't have it but I want to have it)
    I really need this book (I don't have it but I want to have it)
    I have to have this book
    etc.

    _________________________________________________

    English is a context-dependent language. Please give a scenario and/or background information so that we can see what you actually want to say.
     
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