I newly received medication.

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nagomi

Senior Member
Korean
I went to a clinic and got prescribed medication. But it was back to back visit and I already had another set of medication I have received just the day before.

I wondered if it's safe to take those two sets of medication since they both were for the same symptoms.

I'd ask "Can I newly received medication together with the one I got the day before?"

I find "newly" very unusual, but I believe you've got my point.

What's the adverb or adverbial phrase I would haved used instead?
 
  • Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    You could use an adjective instead.

    "Can I take this new medication together with the one I got the day before?"
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    You could use an adjective instead.

    "Can I take this new medication together with the one I got the day before?"
    That could depend on how you're habituated, but as a native speaker (from your profile) have you never had the need to use an adverb? What if I already have missed the chance to say "new" as an adjective as I was subcounciously waiting to use an adverb to mean "new"? Is that a failed sentence from a native speaker's view, and I need to start over?
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    I think you're missing a word, right?
    What do you mean by "missing a word"? I don't know the word I want? In that case, yes. I'm looking for a way to put "new" in an adverb just in case when I forgot to use it as an adjective. Adverb only comes natural to me. But if that's not the case with how native speakers feel and they always think first of an adjective "new" unavoidably, then I should get used to it.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    It would be possible to say
    "Can I take this newly prescribed medication together with the one I got the day before?"
    "Can I take this recently prescribed medication together with the one I got the day before?"
     

    nagomi

    Senior Member
    Korean
    It would be possible to say
    "Can I take this newly prescribed medication together with the one I got the day before?"
    "Can I take this recently prescribed medication together with the one I got the day before?"
    Thank you, 'recently' never came to me for that use.
    But now I see some pattern with "newly" somehow it always comes with another noun or adjective like "newly-weds", or "newly-earned".
    Somehow you don't say "we've newly started this project", which is common in my language. Of course, I better not expect those two langauges to share similarities, but I think most languages may have this quite important component: the idea of newly.

    These are where a speaker of my language often think of the idea of "newly":
    a) He newly got a job.
    b) I newly printed it out.
    c) We saw the newly assigned manager.

    Do you find those "newly"s fit in the sentences?
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    There's nothing much wrong with "Can I take this newly prescribed medication with the stuff I was given yesterday?", but why would we when we could say "this new medication"?

    It's very unusual to use "newly" with an active verb.
    He newly got a job. :cross::cross:
    I newly printed it out. :cross::cross:
    It's usually used with a past participle - newly minted coins, newly baked bread, newly appointed manager.
     

    Hildy1

    Senior Member
    English - US and Canada
    I agree with Andygc:

    a. "This new medication" is better than "this newly prescribed medication".

    2. Sentences a. and b. in #10 are wrong.
    Sentence c. is possible, but "the new manager" is better.
     
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