I own a human Cindy

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Doling

Senior Member
Chinese
Dear all
The following contents come from a novel called "A Tiny Bit Marvellous".
Mother Mo is bothered about her daughter Dora's rudeness.

What a huge difference between fifteen and seventeen years of age. <deletion> Why have I been sent this Tango-skinned bleached-hair designer slave? I own a human Cindy. Her insufferable rudeness grows with every waking moment. <deletion>

What I can't understand here is the sentance " I own a human Cindy"
What does " I own a human" mean here?
 
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  • natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Doling, I think the clue is in the sentence before. The narrator is describing her daughter wanting to look fashionable ('designer slave' means 'a slave to designer fashion' = someone who follows fashion religiously). Sindy is the name of a British fashion doll. So Mo is asking why has her daughter become like Sindy (I think the author spelt it Cindy wrongly) - her daughter has become like the doll, only she's human - therefore, a human Sindy​. (The mother 'owns' the daughter in a metaphorical fashion.)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, I agree with Natkretep. My interpretation was way off. I don't know much about fashion dolls. Had it had the sense I took it to have, it would have needed a comma before Cindy.

    Human is clearly here an adjective rather than a noun.
     

    LilianaB

    Banned
    Lithuanian
    Yes, I agree. As regards the use of the verb own, I think dolls can be owned: humans can't. If the girl is compared to being a doll she can probably be owned too
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Hmm, the wiki link above says:

    The name "Sindy" was chosen after a street poll where young girls were shown a photo of the doll and asked to choose their favourite name from a list of four.[3] The most popular choice was "Cindy", and the spelling made more unique for trademarking.
    referencing Room, Adrian (1982). Dictionary of trade name origins. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wonder whether the Cindy in my link is earlier that your Sindy, or some kind of marketing imitation!
    I think you will find that Cindy was a cardboard cut-out that wore flat paper clothes held on with folded tabs, whereas Sindy was a "Tango-skinned bleached-hair designer slave" rather like that other plastic, pneumatic, bimbo, Barbie.
     

    George French

    Senior Member
    English - UK
    I think you will find that Cindy was a cardboard cut-out that wore flat paper clothes held on with folded tabs, whereas Sindy was a "Tango-skinned bleached-hair designer slave" rather like that other plastic, pneumatic, bimbo, Barbie.
    Has anyone got a copy of "A Tiny Bit Marvellous" by Dawn French who can look up the spelling of SCindy used in the book?

    GF..
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    It is a time when things around us were less sexualised, and the included toys for kids. In the past toys were seen as more age-appropriate than they sometimes seem today.
     
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