I pass over the sort of slur conveyed in this suggestion on the character of my beloved

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Irelia20150604

Senior Member
Chinese
The quotation comes from Jane Eyre Chapter 23

Quotation: I wish to remind you that it was you who first said to me, with that discretion I respect in you—with that foresight, prudence, and humility which befit your responsible and dependent position—that in case I married Miss Ingram, both you and little Adèle had better trot forthwith. I pass over the sort of slur conveyed in this suggestion on the character of my beloved; indeed, when you are far away, Janet, I’ll try to forget it: I shall notice only its wisdom; which is such that I have made it my law of action. Adèle must go to school; and you, Miss Eyre, must get a new situation.”
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Hi everyone! I don’t quite understand the bold part. I try to interpret it as below. Is it correct?

I pass over (=ignore) the sort of slur conveyed in this suggestion (that in case I married Miss Ingram, both you and little Adèle had better trot forthwith) on the character (=moral or ethical quality) of my beloved.
 
  • sampathronjay

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    Does this mean sending you away is a wise thing and I have made sure all of my actions are wise ones?

    I shall notice only its wisdom; which is such that I have made it my law of action.
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Does this mean sending you away is a wise thing and I have made sure all of my actions are wise ones?
    He means: There's some wisdom in what you say. Sending you away in order to make your position better is a wise thing. Sending Adele away to school is a wise thing.

    The slur is that Jane was saying Miss Ingram wouldn't want her and Adele around at all. He's saying that's a slur--that Miss Ingram would want him to send Jane and Adele away, but he's also saying that if they went away to specific places--Jane to a better position and Adele to school--that'd be a wise thing to do.

    Does "beloved" means Ms.Ingram?
    It can only be her. Rochester planned to marry her.

     

    sampathronjay

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    He means: There's some wisdom in what you say. Sending you away in order to make your position better is a wise thing. Sending Adele away to school is a wise thing.

    The slur is that Jane was saying Miss Ingram wouldn't want her and Adele around at all. He's saying that's a slur--that Miss Ingram would want him to send Jane and Adele away, but he's also saying that if they went away to specific places--Jane to a better position and Adele to school--that'd be a wise thing to do.


    It can only be her. Rochester planned to marry her.
    ok
     

    sampathronjay

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    He means: There's some wisdom in what you say. Sending you away in order to make your position better is a wise thing. Sending Adele away to school is a wise thing.

    The slur is that Jane was saying Miss Ingram wouldn't want her and Adele around at all. He's saying that's a slur--that Miss Ingram would want him to send Jane and Adele away, but he's also saying that if they went away to specific places--Jane to a better position and Adele to school--that'd be a wise thing to do.


    It can only be her. Rochester planned to marry her.
    Still can't understand to get the picture clearly in my mind.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I think Barque has explained it very well.

    Jane had said that if Rochester married Blanche Ingram, she (Jane) would have to leave Rochester's employment and Adele would also have to go away. She said those things because she knew that Blanche would treat them both badly, and she didn't want to stay on with Blanche as mistress of the house.

    The implication that Blanche would be an unbearable mistress was a "slur" on her character, but Rochester recognises that there is truth (wisdom) in what Jane said. He accepts that Jane will not be able to stay on in his house once he and Blanche are married.
     

    sampathronjay

    Senior Member
    Sinhala
    I think Barque has explained it very well.

    Jane had said that if Rochester married Blanche Ingram, she (Jane) would have to leave Rochester's employment and Adele would also have to go away. She said those things because she knew that Blanche would treat them both badly, and she didn't want to stay on with Blanche as mistress of the house.

    The implication that Blanche would be an unbearable mistress was a "slur" on her character, but Rochester recognises that there is truth (wisdom) in what Jane said. He accepts that Jane will not be able to stay on in his house once he and Blanche are married.
    :thumbsup:
     
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