I put the pot on the stove.

Maranello_rosso

Senior Member
Russian
Hello everyone.
Could you please help me out?

If I want to say : I put the pot on the stove.
What verb should I take for "to put" here?

Stellen is for vertical position. And the pot can stand.
Legen is for horizontal position and the pot can lays as well.

I am not sure what verb to use.

Thank you in advance.
 
  • Uncle BBB

    Senior Member
    German
    Ich stelle den Topf auf den Herd.

    But: Ich lege den Deckel auf den Herd.

    I have no idea why.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    I agree. Stellen is vertically.

    You can only use "legen", if the pot is empty.
    Ich lege den Topf auf den Herd. (It sounds strange, nevertheless - by semantic reasons. You put it with the side on the stove and it can roll away. Why should you?)
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    True but a pan is wider than high and it's also "stellen". That hint with vertically and horizontally does not always help.
    I would say for every (roughly) cylindrical object, stehen and liegen are defined the same way, irrespective of its proportions. A lid, on the over hand, does not count as being cylindrical in shape.
     

    Alan Evangelista

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    I would say for every (roughly) cylindrical object, stehen and liegen are defined the same way, irrespective of its proportions. A lid, on the over hand, does not count as being cylindrical in shape.
    A pan lid is as cylindrical as a pan. There is already one rule with exceptions, adding more rules with exceptions only overcomplicates the matter IMHO. It is just simpler to accept that the stellen/legen/setzen selection criteria has exceptions and memorize them.
     

    Alan Evangelista

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    The shape paradigm that governs the usage of liegen and stehen for a lid is a Scheibe or Platte (=disk or plate) and note a cylinder.
    I see your point, but it still seems confusing to me because both the traditional stellen/legen/setzen selection criterias and this cylinder one overlap and you have to memorize which criteria to use when you have a cylindrical disk shaped object (eg a lid).
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    A pan lid is as cylindrical as a pan.
    As berndf, I don't understand your point of view. I'd not say that a lid is cylindrical.

    Und selbstverständlich würde ich sagen: "den (Pfannen)Deckel auf/ neben den Herd legen".

    Möglich wäre eventuell: Ich stelle den Deckel (aufrecht) aufs Abtropfgestell/ in die Spülmaschine.


    [Topf auf den Herd] "stellen" (more common) or "setzen".
    "[Topf auf den Herd] setzen" is extremely rare / regional / archaic.
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    cylindrical disk shaped object
    An object is either cylindrical or disk shaped. Those are mutually exclusive categories. As so often, if you try to formalize a conceptual distinction, you will find that there is a grey area. But in this case it seems quite clear to me that a lid is more accurately described as a disk or plate and a pan is more accurately described as a cylinder.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    ...


    "[Topf auf den Herd] setzen" is extremely rare / regional / archaic.
    This is true, kind of archaic. I use it sometimes but seldom.
    The idiom: "Das Essen aufsetzen" is not so seldom in my envrironment, however.

    An object is either cylindrical or disk shaped. Those are mutually exclusive categories. As so often, if you try to formalize a conceptual distinction, you will find that there is a grey area. But in this case it seems quite clear to me that a lid is more accurately described as a disk or plate and a pan is more accurately described as a cylinder.
    :tick::thumbsup:

    Some more heuristics:
    The bottom of a pan ist bottom/Boden. Ich stelle die Pfanne auf den Herd.
    A disk or a plate do not have a defined bottom. So there the horicontal/vertical rule is working.
    You can say: Ich stelle das Brett in den Schrank (meaning vertically).
    Ich lege das Brett auf den Tisch.

    If it has feet by design, you would say: Ich stelle es auf den Tisch. But this is very seldom. I found examples in the Internet, called
    Servier-Brett mit Füßen. I also found pictures, but unfortunately only at commercial sites.

    Feet will superseed usually other rules.

    The bottom of a pan is a kind of feet, some pans have actually more feet.

    Many animals have feet. If they are standing on their feet, it is "stehen", independent on whether they are longer or higher.

    As a kind of metaphor: if the ground parts are on the ground it is stehen, if the side parts are on the ground it is setzen.

    That is why:

    Ich stelle die Tasse/den Topf/den Teller auf den Tisch

    but "ich lege das Messer auf den Tisch."

    Löffel and Gabel: Ich lege sie auf den Tisch. Actually a default knife cannot stay on the table.

    There is a big amount of logic, but it is not based on pure geometry alone..
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    The idiom: "Das Essen aufsetzen" is not so seldom in my envrironment, however.
    "aufsetzen" ist ein Verb an sich. (Man kann nicht sagen "Ich setze das Essen auf den Herd auf.")

    aufsetzen = etw. aufs Feuer setzen
    Beispiele:
    Kartoffeln, Fleisch (zum Kochen) aufsetzen
    (Tee)wasser aufsetzen
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    "aufsetzen" ist ein Verb an sich. (Man kann nicht sagen "Ich setze das Essen auf den Herd auf.")

    aufsetzen = etw. aufs Feuer setzen
    Beispiele:
    Kartoffeln, Fleisch (zum Kochen) aufsetzen
    (Tee)wasser aufsetzen
    :tick::thumbsup: Genau.
    Ich vermute, es ist durch Verkürzung entstanden.
    Teewasser (im Kessel) aufs Feuer setzen. (Hier würde "stellen" und "legen" nicht funktionieren, obwohl sie im Kontext die gleiche Bedeutung hätten.)

    Ich denke, es hat mit dem Thema zu tun, denn es grenzt die Begriffe voneinander ab.
    Man setzt das Essen auf, indem man es im Topf auf den Herd/das Feuer stellt.
     

    Alan Evangelista

    Senior Member
    Brazilian Portuguese
    An object is either cylindrical or disk shaped. Those are mutually exclusive categories.
    Mathematically speaking, a cylinder is a three-dimensional object with two parallel rounded bases (circles or ellipsis) connected by a curved surface. Thus, all 3D disks are cylinders.

    What you probably meant by "disk" is a cylinder which height is smaller than its diameter (or which has a "very small" height) and by "cylinder" the other way around. In this case, your point is valid.

    As we have already discussed in the past, the traditional rule for picking the correct "put" verb in German has some inconsistencies and I prefer to just memorize them instead of creating new additional rules. Other people are free to face it differently.

    [Topf auf den Herd] setzen" is extremely rare /regional / archaic.
    Thanks for the info. However, it is confusing that it is not tagged as such in Duden | setzen | Rechtschreibung, Bedeutung, Definition, Synonyme, Herkunft
     
    Last edited:

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Mathematically speaking
    We are not speaking mathematically. We are speaking about the concepts about physical shapes on which natural language is based. If you want to understand language usage it makes no sense trying to to ponder on what these concepts "ought" to be rather than what they are.
    What you probably meant by "disk" is a cylinder which height is smaller than its diameter (or which has a "very small" height) and by "cylinder" the other way around.
    It has more to do with an object's function than with its proportion. Cylinders have a diameter and a height, disks have a diameter and a thickness. A cylinder has a volume and having a volume is part of the definition of the object. In the case of a pot or pan, this volume contains the food prepared with it. In case of a disk containing a volume is not part of the definition of the object itself.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    In der oben verlinkten 6. Ausgabe des Duden steht noch "landsch. = regional"; diese Anmerkung ist in der digitalen Form leider unter den Tisch gefallen. :(
    Wenn Du sagst regional, für welche Regionen ist das deiner Meinung nach spezifisch?
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Wenn Du sagst regional, für welche Regionen sollte das spezifisch sein?
    Keine Ahnung - das habe ich dem Duden (6. Ausgabe) entnommen.

    Ich persönlich habe das in alten Büchern schon gelesen (d.h. doch, dass es in manchen Gegenden verwendet wird/ wurde, oder?), selbst verwende ich "auf den Herd setzen" nie.
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Ich persönlich habe das in alten Büchern schon gelesen (d.h. doch, dass es in manchen Gegenden verwendet wird/ wurde, oder?), selbst verwende ich "auf den Herd setzen" nie.
    Ich selbst verwende es fallweise. Meine Mutter aber so gut wie immer.

    Benutzt du auch nie aufsetzen als trennbares Verb im Sinne von auf den heißen Herd stellen? (Setzt Du bitte die Kartoffel auf?)
     

    berndf

    Moderator
    German (Germany)
    Interessant. Es scheint sich tatsächlich um deutlichere Unterschiede zu handeln, als ich dachte. Aufsetzen ist nämlich nicht warm stellen. Aufsetzen bezeichnet den ganzen Vorgang des Aufheizen der Herdplatte, des Befüllen des Topfes mit den zu garenden Lebensmitteln und des Stellens des Todes auf die heiße Herdplatte. Wenn meine Mutter sagte, sie stelle die Kartoffel auf den Herd, würde ich annehmen, sie stelle einen Topf mit Kartoffeln auf den kalten Herd, z.B. weil sie sie zu einem späteren Zeitpunkt kochen will.
     

    Hutschi

    Senior Member
    Keine Ahnung - das habe ich dem Duden (6. Ausgabe) entnommen.

    Ich persönlich habe das in alten Büchern schon gelesen (d.h. doch, dass es in manchen Gegenden verwendet wird/ wurde, oder?), selbst verwende ich "auf den Herd setzen" nie.
    Ich verwende es regelmäßig in der Form "Das Essen auf den Herd setzen." (Das ist natürlich eine umgangssprachliche Verkürzung für "das Essen im entsprechenden Gerät auf den Herd setzen.")
    Ich kenne die Verbreitung der Wendungen aber nicht.

    "Das Essen auf den Herd stellen" - hier würde ich eher an einen kalten Herd denken. Also wie Bernd.

    Das weist zugleich auf eine weite Verbreitung hin, denn wir kommen aus sehr verschiedenen Gegenden.
    Viele Grüße vom anderen Bernd (Hutschi)
     

    JClaudeK

    Senior Member
    Français France, Deutsch (SW-Dtl.)
    Aufsetzen ist nämlich nicht warm stellen.
    Ja, Du hast recht (in der Eile geschrieben, hatte ich das inzwischen wieder gelöscht, wahrscheinlich während Du Deine Antwort schriebst).
    "warm stellen" bedeutet "(etw. was schon/ noch warm war) warm halten".

    "Bei uns" sagt man statt "aufsetzen": "Kannst Du bitte Wasser (für den Tee) warm machen?"
     
    Last edited:
    < Previous | Next >
    Top