I realized I had left my passport home.

8769

Senior Member
Japanese and Japan
I understand #1 is correct and natural for the blank in the sentence below.
1. at my home

On the way to the airport, I realized I had left my passport ( ).

How about #2? Is it correct and natural, too?
2. home
 
  • deddish

    Senior Member
    English .ca
    You could say "at home", but not just "home".

    If you say "I had left my passport home," it sounds like 'passport' is some kind of adjective. Like a beach house, a holiday home, a summer home, and a random... passport home? A house full of passports?

    So yes, you need the "at". The "my" is not necessary.
     
    Yeah, that's what I realized last time when I was stopped by the frontier guards on the Russian-Latvian border:(

    The correct answer here is "at home", yet, I think, as Erebos suggested, "at my house" may be an appropriate form for stating the location of your passport in some formal situations.
     

    8769

    Senior Member
    Japanese and Japan
    I've found that an English-Japanese dictionary at hand show the following example sentences using "home" as an adverb:
    3. Leave your cell-phone home on your day off.
    4. To leave a dog home is tantamount to cruelty.

    Are #3 and #4, above, correct English?
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    This is an interesting question, 87.

    Most of the time, we say "at home" when we specifically mean the building where we live.

    On the other hand, our children are much older now, but when they were teenagers, we left them home while traveling.

    This doesn't mean they never left the house and "home" meant they weren't traveling with us.

    My wife might call me on my mobile phone and ask "Are you home, yet?" In this case, I might be in the driveway or mowing the lawn, but I would be "home" within the scope of the question.

    I might walk into my house and call out "I'm home" (There was even a popular song, Honey, I'm home.) Nobody would consider "home" an adjective here, of course.

    Usually "home" is deemed to be the home of the speaker and "my" unnecessary.

    I understand that this is all very vague. Like many English expressions, actual usage depends upon the habits of native speakers and/or the context. One picks up the common usage from reading and listening to native speakers.

    I don't see anything grammatically incorrect about your sentences three and four, but #4 is rather weird as it stands. Millions of people go to work or school and leave their dogs (at) home during the day in perfectly comfortable conditions - either alone or with another member of the family.

    Good luck.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    I couldn't omit at in those sentences.
    I leave my passport, my cell phone, my dog, or even my children, at home.

    I don't know if it is general usage, but around here the only context for leaving XXXX home (no preposition) is, rather strangely, to take someone to their home.
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I would have to add an "at" to sentences 3 and 4. Otherwise the nouns do look like adjectives - for me, "to leave a dog home" is to walk out of the door of a home for dogs. However, I suspect it may be common usage in spoken AE.
    As sdgraham says, "I'm home" to announce one's arrival is a well-known exception.
     

    deddish

    Senior Member
    English .ca
    an afterthought...

    It would really depend on how you said it out loud.

    "I left my dog home yesterday" Would need a strong inflection on the word 'dog' to sound natural to my ear. I'm not sure why. But it would still be better with 'at'.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I couldn't omit at in those sentences.
    I leave my passport, my cell phone, my dog, or even my children, at home.

    I don't know if it is general usage, but around here the only context for leaving XXXX home (no preposition) is, rather strangely, to take someone to their home.
    I don't get the last one. To me 'to leave home' is what your children do when they grow up and finally break out on their own.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    If I am at some social event with someone whose company I enjoy, I might well ask, near the end of the event, if I may leave her home. Well, I used to, once upon a time.
    This kind of expression is also used by parents in relation to children.
    Amy's staying overnight with Jen. The arrangements are that Jen's parents will leave Amy home in the morning.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    If I am at some social event with someone whose company I enjoy, I might well ask, near the end of the event, if I may leave her home. Well, I used to, once upon a time.
    This kind of expression is also used by parents in relation to children.
    Amy's staying overnight with Jen. The arrangements are that Jen's parents will leave Amy home in the morning.
    This must be an Irish usage; I've never heard them before. In the first instance I would have asked the girl if I could take her home (and I don't imply a double meaning here!), and in the second I would have said that Jen's parents would bring her home. :)
     

    liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    If I am at some social event with someone whose company I enjoy, I might well ask, near the end of the event, if I may leave her home. Well, I used to, once upon a time.
    This kind of expression is also used by parents in relation to children.
    Amy's staying overnight with Jen. The arrangements are that Jen's parents will leave Amy home in the morning.
    I have to agree with Porteño. In fact, I'm afraid I didn't understand both sentences until I read Porteño's following post.

    In the first sentence, I took it to mean that the party was in the house of the person whose company you enjoyed and you wanted to be polite about the fact that you were leaving. Having now understood the intended meaning of the phrase, I can imagine the bewildered look of the recipient. No wonder you don't use the line anymore panj :)

    The second example, at first glance appeared to be a typo "will leave Amy's home this morning" but that doesn't make sense because Amy is staying at Jen's house; Jen's parents are not staying at Amy's house. The penny finally dropped but I am completely unfamiliar with this usage.
     
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