I <regarded the idea> with the aversion

park sang joon

Senior Member
Korean
The narrator recalls his adolescence.
He is a writer for several papers.
His old friend Mr. Micawber, who was landlord of the narrator as child, went bankrupt twice, works as the clerk for a local lawyer Uriah Heep.
He met Mr. Micawber in the front of King's bench prison where Mr. Micawber was incarcerate as a debtor, took him to his great aunt's house.

................................................
My aunt leaned her elbow on the little round table that she usually kept beside her, and eyed him attentively. Notwithstanding the aversion with which I regarded the idea of entrapping him into any disclosure he was not prepared to make voluntarily, I should have taken him up at this point, but for the strange proceedings in which I saw him engaged; whereof his putting the lemon-peel into the kettle, the sugar into the snuffer-tray, the spirit into the empty jug, and confidently attempting to pour boiling water out of a candlestick, were among the most remarkable. I saw that a crisis was at hand, and it came. He clattered all his means and implements together, rose from his chair, pulled out his pocket-handkerchief, and burst into tears.
[David Copperfield by Charles Dickens]
I think "regarded something" means "think of something" here.
So I was wondering if we can use "regard" in such a usage.
Thank you in advance for your help.
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    "Think of" in the sense of "have an opinion about", yes. Yes, this is a valid way of using "regard". Have you come across many examples of Dickens using words in incorrect ways?
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glasguensis, for your so very helpful answer. :)
    I thought "regard something" means "look at something."
    I don't think so, I'd just like to know this usage is idiomatic in present English.
     

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    But we often use verbs related to sight when talking about opinions.

    I see that as xxx
    I regard that as xxx
    I look upon that as xxx
    I think that is xxx
    That is xxx in my opinion
    I view that as xxx
    I consider that (to be) xxx
     

    park sang joon

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Thank you, Glasguensis, for your continuing support. :)
    I know those usage.
    But, in my example, "as something" is missing, so I didn't think it means "think of A (as B.)"
     
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