I remember you(r?) doing it

HyphenSpider

Banned
Spanish, Spain
I've got some problems with these sentence transformations. Could you please help me? (I have to use the word in bold and can't write more than five words)

The first one reads: Tell me tomorrow that I have to pay them.
remind Will you ____________ I have to pay them?

I had written "remind me tomorrow that", but my teacher said that it was wrong and we had to write "remind me" (without tomorrow).

The second one says: I remember that you did it even if you don't.
remember I _______________ even if you don't.

Here I said there were two possible answers:
  1. remember you doing it
  2. remember your doing it
But she said number one was wrong :confused:. I need to know why, because I'd always thought that in this kind of sentences you could use both the "pronoun" (me/you/them...) and the "possessive adjective" (my, your, their...).

Thanks a lot,
 
  • Thomas1

    Senior Member
    polszczyzna warszawska
    I've got some problems with these sentence transformations. Could you please help me? (I have to use the word in bold and can't write more than five words)

    The first one reads: Tell me tomorrow that I have to pay them.
    remind Will you ____________ I have to pay them?

    I had written "remind me tomorrow that", but my teacher said that it was wrong and we had to write "remind me" (without tomorrow).

    The second one says: I remember that you did it even if you don't.
    remember I _______________ even if you don't.

    Here I said there were two possible answers:
    1. remember you doing it
    2. remember your doing it
    But she said number one was wrong :confused:. I need to know why, because I'd always thought that in this kind of sentences you could use both the "pronoun" (me/you/them...) and the "possessive adjective" (my, your, their...).

    Thanks a lot,
    Hi,

    Your first sentence; Will you remind me that I have to pay them?; already suggests future so tomorrow may seem a little redundant here, but the adverbial defines accurately when one should remind you of paying someone. I don’t think there’s something grammatically wrong with it but let’s wait for others, maybe I can’t see a nuance.

    As for your second sentence, I read once that in very formal English you should use possessive adjectives with gerunds since their syntax demands that they be used with them. Your example uses gerund so your teacher might have called up this rule. What I abovementioned, however, doesn’t have much to do with reality as you may suppose on how many views your thread had and no one responded. Everyone (or rather each speaker that I talked to) uses possessive adjectives as well as object pronouns in cases alike yours. I am also of your opinion and when I read your post I got slightly astonished to have learnt that you were marked down for your first option. So I looked the thing up in a few books and my sources corroborate that the use of possessive adjective or pronoun object is grammatical. Maybe natives see something here but as far as grammar is concerned I think they’re both fine. There are even cases where, in my opinion, possessive pronouns are used more frequently than object pronouns, e.g.:
    I can’t stop him watching TV all day long.

    Anyway, your teacher seems to be a real nitpicker so knowing the above, you may start using possessive adjectives in cases alike when sitting a test with her marking. :)

    Tom
     

    pyan

    Senior Member
    English, UK, London
    Have you spoken to your teacher about this? If the marks were written the teacher might have made a mistake. They are human.
     

    HyphenSpider

    Banned
    Spanish, Spain
    Have you spoken to your teacher about this? If the marks were written the teacher might have made a mistake. They are human.

    lol. Actually it wasn't an exam but an exercise we did. I sometimes don't understand the teacher, so I asked her to repeat the right answer a few times, and I'm completely sure she said that the only possible answer was "your doing it".

    But the strangest thing is that, in the same exercise, there was a sentence that read:

    Yes, of course I'm sure I paid them. Aren't you?
    remember Don't you _______________ them?

    And this time she was the one who said there were three posible answers:
    1. remember my paying them
    2. remember me paying them
    3. remember that I paid
    I guess that's what left me confused :confused: .

    Your first sentence; Will you remind me that I have to pay them?; already suggests future so tomorrow may seem a little redundant here, but the adverbial defines accurately when one should remind you of paying someone. I don’t think there’s something grammatically wrong with it but let’s wait for others, maybe I can’t see a nuance.

    As for your second sentence, I read once that in very formal English you should use possessive adjectives with gerunds since their syntax demands that they be used with them. Your example uses gerund so your teacher might have called up this rule. What I abovementioned, however, doesn’t have much to do with reality as you may suppose on how many views your thread had and no one responded. Everyone (or rather each speaker that I talked to) uses possessive adjectives as well as object pronouns in cases alike yours. I am also of your opinion and when I read your post I got slightly astonished to have learnt that you were marked down for your first option. So I looked the thing up in a few books and my sources corroborate that the use of possessive adjective or pronoun object is grammatical. Maybe natives see something here but as far as grammar is concerned I think they’re both fine. There are even cases where, in my opinion, possessive pronouns are used more frequently than object pronouns, e.g.:
    I can’t stop him watching TV all day long.

    Ok, thanks for such a good explanation :) .
     
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