I require that she not do it

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queen12

Senior Member
españa, español y gallego
I know the following sentences are right (or I think so):

I require her not to do it

I require she doesn't do it

I require she shouldn't do it.

But, my doubt is if the sentence which is above in the title is right gramatically or it isn't

Thanks and best wishes!
 
  • JamesM

    Senior Member
    It's a rather backwards way of saying something. "I forbid her to do it" or "I forbid her from doing it" (with the opposite being "I require her to do it") would make more sense. I don't know that there is anything wrong with it grammatically, but it's convoluted.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    Yes, your three tries do sound 'convoluted', queen 12, but among them I'd say the first sounds the least convoluted (or - admittedly also rather convoluted - "I require that she not do it.").
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    This is not too convoluted I think and it's surely grammatically correct. It's from a professor of education talking about teaching undergraduate students to write essays:

    "But when I require that they not write traditional essays, but instead "translate" their ideas into a variety of forms, registers and styles -- taking into consideration what is the best way to present ideas to different audiences, and for different purposes -- some seem paralyzed."
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marjorie-faulstich-orellana/valuing-both-breadth-and-_b_935654.html
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    This is not too convoluted I think and it's surely grammatically correct. It's from a professor of education talking about teaching undergraduate students to write essays:

    "But when I require that they not write traditional essays, but instead "translate" their ideas into a variety of forms, registers and styles -- taking into consideration what is the best way to present ideas to different audiences, and for different purposes -- some seem paralyzed."
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marjorie-faulstich-orellana/valuing-both-breadth-and-_b_935654.html
    I'm glad to hear that you and the professor think that my try "I require that (someone) [not] (infinitive)" is correct (and not too convoluted, as I feared)!
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "But when I require that they not write traditional essays, but instead "translate" their ideas into a variety of forms, registers and styles -- taking into consideration what is the best way to present ideas to different audiences, and for different purposes -- some seem paralyzed."
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/marjorie-faulstich-orellana/valuing-both-breadth-and-_b_935654.html
    This sentence negates "write" but it seems to mean to negate "traditional". They're are writing something other than traditional essays. They're not "not writing." ;)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It's the version that's in the thread title ain'tt :) - "I require that she not do it".

    In context it sounds quite different, doesn't it? I agree that it sounds better than the three tries in the first post, though I didn't search for examples of them in context.

    Edit: Hi Myridon,

    I really don't see why "that they not write traditional essays" shouldn't be seen as an example of the construction we're talking about. :confused:
     
    Last edited:

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    This sentence negates "write" but it seems to mean to negate "traditional". They're are writing something other than traditional essays. They're not "not writing." ;)
    Very interesting point, Myridon. In other words, "But when I require that, instead of writing traditional essays, they "translate" their ideas..."?
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    It's the version that's in the thread title ain'tt :) - "I require that she not do it".

    In context it sounds quite different, doesn't it? I agree that it sounds better than the three tries in the first post, though I didn't search for examples of them in context.

    ​Yes, 'tis indeed, veli...
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I really don't see why "that they not write traditional essays" shouldn't be seen as an example of the construction we're talking about. :confused:
    I'm not saying it's not a similar construction. I'm saying it's convoluted and confusing in my opinion. At least the original example doesn't try to combine both what is required and not required.
    When I require them to write essays, I require them to write nontraditional essays. Something is required about the things that are written. Nothing is not required about the things that are not written.
    Now I've confused myself. ;)
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    For Myridon - another example, from a blog and written while Hilary Clinton and Obama were both in the running for President.:

    "I think Obama is a nice guy, and that’s all I require in a president. I require that they not think up demeaning nicknames for people. This should be a no-doubter."
    https://thisrecording.wordpress.com/?s=Obama+is+a+nice+guy
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    For Myridon - another example, from a blog and written while Hilary Clinton and Obama were both in the running for President.:

    "I think Obama is a nice guy, and that’s all I require in a president. I require that they not think up demeaning nicknames for people. This should be a no-doubter."
    This doesn't try to tell me what they are thinking by telling me that they are not thinking. One less convolution. The other sentence would go on to imply that they are thinking up complimentary nicknames names for people.
     
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