I salute you!

covkid

Member
USA,UK,English
I am writing a formal letter of thanks to two professional gentlemen in Mexico. To show my great appreciation, I want to say " .... Sirs, I salute you!"

My best attempt is "¡Señores, yo saludo Ustedes!". However, I have four questions:
1. Do I need the "yo" for emphasis?
2. Is the use of "Ustedes" correct here, or should it be "¡Señores, les saludo!"?
3. If the "Ustedes" is correct, is it also correct to capitalise the "U", as I did?
4. Is the whole phraseology so ugly/clumsy, that I should find another way to say it?

Again, this is a formal letter to two doctors whom I know only professionally, and they speak Mexican Spanish. Additionally, I don't mind if the phraseology is a little old-fashioned/over the top; (a) I'm pretty old myself, and (b) I really do want them to feel good/proud.

Any help would be most appreciated!

Thanking you in anticipation,

Covkid
 
  • blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    Hello.

    I'd say: ¡Señores, les saludo!

    You can say 'les saludo a ustedes', but not 'les saludo ustedes'. Yes, you can use 'yo' for emphasis. 'Ustedes' is not capitalised, but you might want to capitalise it for 'special effect'. To me it sounds a bit funny, but I suppose it would be okay because of the original in English.

    Let's wait for more replies, especially from some Mexican foreros. Saludos.
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Hey, blasita, you did it again! You cover all of the ground, give me plenty of options, but also give me what I most need and respect, your own preferred solution. Thank you so much!

    As for waiting for some Mexican input, I think that's a great idea. And while I'm waiting, I shall dash back to the wordref. dictionary to find out what 'foreros' means. (Thanks, I love discovering new words!)

    Covkid
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Thanks for the input, Agró! I'll take your (and blasita's) word for it but, for my further education, could you possibly explain to me why would Mexicans prefer 'los'? That's a grammatical usage I've never heard of.

    Thanks,
    Covkid
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    You're very welcome, Covkid.

    It is acceptable to use 'le/s' for 'usted/es' here (it is called 'leísmo de cortesía'), but the verb 'saludar' is transitive and goes with a D.O. so 'los/las' (for people) is correct. I would personally use 'les' but this is not used the same way in other places. Am I explaining myself?
     
    Last edited:

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    You're very welcome, Covkid.

    It is acceptable to use 'le/s' for 'usted/es' here (it is called 'leísmo de cortesía'), but the verb 'saludar' is transitive and goes with a D.O. so 'los/las' (for people) is correct. I would personally use 'les' but this is not used the same way in other places. Am I explaining myself?
     

    mentayflor

    Senior Member
    español/Argentina
    ¡Señores, yo saludo Ustedes!
    Hola Covkid, no se usa ese encabezado para una carta.
    Para una carta de agredecimiento podrías comenzar:

    Muy señores (Sres.) mios,
    Estimados (nombres),
    De mi mayor consideración,
    De toda consideración,


    Saludos
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Yes, thanks, blasita, I do understand your explanation. And to be honest, since I first learned what little pidgin-Spanish I have in Europe, your 'les' version sounded more familiar to my very limited ear. However, I also understand why 'los' appears more grammatically correct.

    Soooo ..... with reference to your 'this is not used the same way in other places' comment, I searched some more threads and found this one http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=426404&referrerid=228780, wherein 'Iv93' from Monterrey, Mexico says that both forms are used in Mexico, the 'les' form more commonly in formal written communication, and appears to suggest that it is indeed better for application to, for instance, 'caballeros', which is exactly what I was looking for.

    So, unless I hear differently from more Mexican foreros (thank you for that word!), I shall go with 'les', with all due respect to Agró, of course. Hopefully, Agró won't mind, because, after all, it does seem almost to come down to a case of personal preference.

    Thanks each! Again!

    Covkid
     

    blasita

    Senior Member
    Spain. Left six years ago
    It is indeed as covkid says; while we would prefer "los" in informal occasions, "les" is more preferable when writing formally.
    Good to know, Luisangel. Same here. Thank you; now it's all clear for Covkid. Un saludo.

    You're welcome, Covkid. Yes, 'los' is more 'grammatically correct', but in my neck of the woods 'les' (as we know now that in Mexico) is more appropriate in these cases. Suerte y saludos.
     

    Wandering JJ

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hi covkid.

    Sorry to come in late on this interesting thread, but I felt I should point out that in saying Les/los saludo the impact on hispanohablantes may not be the same as using the English 'I salute you' because saludar is the usual verb to express 'greet', 'say hello to', 'pass on ones regards to' as well as meaning 'to salute'.

    Personally, I would use a more formal start to your letter, as already suggested, then get something in early in the letter using a verb like estimar to show how you hold these doctors in great esteem, etc.

    My comments are in no way at loggerheads with what Blasita et al. have said: the emphasis changed largely from the use of 'salute' to whether you should use los/les in your construction and the various comments were very enlightening - especially as I shall be in Mexico for a few days in January.

    Un saludo.
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Thanks mentayflor! Actually, I wasn't using the "¡Señores, yo saludo Ustedes!" as an opener. I am using it towards the end of the letter, almost as an introduction to my final words of thanks. However, I do appreciate your input. Indeed, I rather like your "Muy señores mios" as an opening salutation; for some reason, it just has the right 'feel' for me, for setting the general tone of the letter that follows. Thanks! I shall use it.

    Covkid
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Well, luisangel91, that really wraps it up, doesn't it! We were looking for some definitive input from a native Mexican and you've provided it. Thank you! "les" it is!
     

    covkid

    Member
    USA,UK,English
    Hey, Wandering JJ, it's never too late to inject additional opinion into the discussion. The more, the merrier, says I!

    However, as you can see from my reply today to mentayflor, I wasn't using it as opener to the letter. Nevertheless, what you say about the double, and possibly more common, usage of the verb "saludar" is something I hadn't thought about.

    Hmmm ....... problem is, unless someone can come up with a different verb for "to salute s.b.", I'm kind of stuck. Yes, you're right, I could eliminate it altogether and utilize some alternative phraseology, but the sense of "I salute you", especially with "caballeros" thrown in, just evokes (to me, at least) exactly the kind of sentiment I was trying to get across to these two doctors. Old-fashioned, quaint, probably a bit corny, yes - but then again, that's me.

    I guess, when all is said and done, and they've had a good chuckle at my expense, they'll at least understand what I was trying (in my awful mix of schoolboy Castillian, and late-life Mexican, Spanish) to say - namely, thank you, gentlemen, I really appreciate your excellent skills and your wonderful demeanor, etc, etc, blah, blah, blah ......

    Thanks again, JJ, enjoy Mexico! And I trust you're not doing too much "wandering" off the beaten track whilst you're there. Unfortunately, the current problems make such ventures rather more risky than they used to be. Indeed, most estadounidenses reckon I'm absolutely crazy to even venture into Tijuana as often as I do. Hey, it's still a great country, with beautiful people, but one just has to be a little more cautious than previously. Take care and have a great time!

    Covkid
     
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