I shall...

carmen37

Member
España/ español
I know it´s not importatnt, but, do you really use "I shall....", "we shall..." for future tense? I never hear it in songs or films. However, I could fail an exam for that reason. That´s why I always avoid it and use I"ll o we´ll. What do you think, english speakers?

Thanks
 
  • lauranazario

    Moderatrix
    Español puertorriqueño & US English
    Hi Carmen,
    This is basically a grammar question, so I'm going to switch it over to the Grammar forum.
    Wait... now that I think about it... are you asking about English grammar? I can also tranfer you there if iyou'd like that.

    Saludos,
    LN
     

    Focalist

    Senior Member
    European Union, English
    It's not always possible, though, to hide behind I'll and we'll..
    Sometimes the shall (when it stands on its own, meaning Lo haré) has to come out of the closet:

    'I hope you get it.'
    'I think I shall, you know.'

    'Should I talk to him? I shall, I shall!'

    Still and all, that use of shall is rather British...

    Hugh Grant as The Terminator...

    'I shall, you know, if it's not too much trouble, all things considered...be back!'
    F
     

    carmen37

    Member
    España/ español
    thank you both. Then, I think I'll go on using shall, just because my english teacher loves it. And, of course, he´s british.
     

    Tabac

    Senior Member
    U. S. - English
    carmen37 said:
    thank you both. Then, I think I'll go on using shall, just because my english teacher loves it. And, of course, he´s british.
    The British still use it quite a lot. I'm not certain about the 'rules'.

    In U.S. English, I was taught, back in the Dark Ages, that "shall" goes with the first person singular, and first person plural; "will" goes with the others. If one wants to be emphatic, the usage is switched.

    This has all gone by the wayside here in the States, and to some extent the "shall" is used only for emphasis no matter what form of the verb. Hence, the song "We shall overcome". And whatever general (MacArthur?) during WWII who warned "I shall return". (By the old rule, "will" should be used in both cases to show emphasis of the first person.)
     

    sallyjoe

    Member
    UK English
    As you know we use 'will' for the future, eg She'll be in Tokyo; I think you'll pass the exam. (ll - 'will').

    Shall is usually used for suggestions/to make the future tense or to indicate intention or obligation or inevitability/asking for advice.
    for example shall we go to the cinema? Lets go to the cinema, shall we?
    I shall catch the 5 o'clock train.
    What shall I do?

    Should is the past tense of shall.

    Hope this helps.

    carmen37 said:
    I know it´s not importatnt, but, do you really use "I shall....", "we shall..." for future tense? I never hear it in songs or films. However, I could fail an exam for that reason. That´s why I always avoid it and use I"ll o we´ll. What do you think, english speakers?

    Thanks
     

    Lora

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    Ok the following is from a grammar book:

    For the 1st person singular and plural (never for the 2nd or 3rd person) shall and should are frequently used instead of will and would. This is a difficult area of advice, especially becuase of other auxiliary uses of should and would. To be strictly correct, you should write:

    I shall be at the meeting next week (future)

    We never though that we should see our home again. (future in the past)

    This is, however, a rule that is often broken: I will and I would are normal in speech and informal writing. Furthermore it is preferable to use will when there is a suggestion of intent. So, if there is a hint that you might be voted off the committee or might stay at home to nurse a cold, it is normal to scotch the rumours with, 'I will be at the meeting.'


    I hope this helps :)
     

    Nick

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    carmen37 said:
    I know it´s not importatnt, but, do you really use "I shall....", "we shall..." for future tense? I never hear it in songs or films. However, I could fail an exam for that reason. That´s why I always avoid it and use I"ll o we´ll. What do you think, english speakers?
    No, we really do not use them. "Shall" is rarley used. We use "will" instead.
     

    jrr7

    New Member
    USA, English
    I had been taught that proper usage was "shall" to indicate an event in the future, and "will" to indicate volition or intention. But I'm not sure about that.
     

    carmen37

    Member
    España/ español
    The rule I was taught is very easy. The future tense is built with subject + will + verb, except in the case of the first singular and plural person, when you have to use subject (I, We) + shall + verb. I notice it's not so easy in practice.

    Thanks
     

    Lora

    Senior Member
    UK, English
    jrr7 said:
    I had been taught that proper usage was "shall" to indicate an event in the future, and "will" to indicate volition or intention. But I'm not sure about that.
    I think your rule is correct Carmen...as is ^. However 'will' is much more commonly used.
     
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