I should have thought

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Tony100000

Senior Member
Portuguese
Does this expression mean "It was expected to be obvious" in this sentence?
I can't quite understand it.

Example:

Mariah: Why can't I turn the television on?
John: I should have thought it was obvious. The TV is not plugged in.

Thanks in advance!
 
  • MuttQuad

    Senior Member
    English - AmE
    John is saying he expected that it would be obvious to Mariah that the TV wasn't plugged in. That is, she should have checked to see.
     

    sound shift

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I hear a lot of older BrE speakers (myself included) say "I should have thought it was obvious". It's the same as "I would have thought it was obvious". I agree with MuttQuad about the meaning.
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    I also agree with MuttQuad entirely.
    And with Giorgio. It is not the "should" of obligation, but rather the " 'should' for 'would' " of that variety of English (perhaps "older BrE speakers", as sound shift said)
    that uses the "sh-" forms in the first person: I shall, you will, he/she will, we shall,...
    Not found in Am.Eng.
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    It is not the "should" of obligation, but rather the " 'should' for 'would' " of that variety of English (perhaps "older BrE speakers", as sound shift said)
    that uses the "sh-" forms in the first person: I shall, you will, he/she will, we shall,...
    Not found in Am.Eng.
    We spend at least a week in ninth-grade English class going over when to use will/would and when to use shall/should. I never did get it straight. :) I think the only way I would use should in that sense is in the sentence "I should think so" (or variants thereof).
     

    perpend

    Banned
    American English
    I also agree with MuttQuad entirely.
    And with Giorgio. It is not the "should" of obligation, but rather the " 'should' for 'would' " of that variety of English (perhaps "older BrE speakers", as sound shift said)
    that uses the "sh-" forms in the first person: I shall, you will, he/she will, we shall,...
    Not found in Am.Eng.
    Those forms are still found in American English, you just have to find them. :) There are regions where those forms are used.
     
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