I speak Japanese.

  • Bibysnice

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Mexico
    Ok if it is in Japanese.....
    Watashi wa nihongo o hanashimasu, anatta wa nihongo o hanashimasen.....

    ;)
    Please correct me if im wrong
     

    Cereth

    Senior Member
    Español
    1.watashi wa nihongo wo hanasemasu - i can speak japanese
    2.anata wa nihongo wo hanasemasen -you can´t speak japanese

    3."watashi wa nihon go wo hanashimasu" just means i speak japanese
    4."anata wa nihon go wo hanashimasen" is you don´t speak japanese

    you can also say nihon go wo hanasu koto ga dekimasu
    and anata wa nihon go wo hanasu koto ga dekimasen (means the same than the examples 1 and 2).

    that´s what i think but correct me if i´m wrong

    mata ne!
     

    kikou

    Member
    Japan
    Cereth said:
    1.watashi wa nihongo wo hanasemasu - i can speak japanese
    2.anata wa nihongo wo hanasemasen -you can´t speak japanese

    3."watashi wa nihon go wo hanashimasu" just means i speak japanese
    4."anata wa nihon go wo hanashimasen" is you don´t speak japanese

    you can also say nihon go wo hanasu koto ga dekimasu
    and anata wa nihon go wo hanasu koto ga dekimasen (means the same than the examples 1 and 2).

    that´s what i think but correct me if i´m wrong

    mata ne!
    ;) Perfect!!! 完璧(かんぺき)!!;)

    じゃあね
     

    Xaphirezst

    Member
    ?
    o (お) is not the same as wo (を)
    but wo often pronounced as o, like ha often pronounced as wa.
    for example, we write konnichiha but we pronounce it as konnichiwa
     

    toscairn

    Banned
    Japan
    Ciao TimeHP!
    Either will do, pronunciation-wise.
    But, if you type with the keyboard, you're supposed to type "wo" as particle.
    As a trivia: More Japanese pronounce it "o" than "wo."
     

    TimeHP

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    In my grammar book the particle O is placed after a noun to indicate that the noun is the direct object... :confused:
    Ciao
     

    erick

    Senior Member
    English (USA)
    TimeHP said:
    In my grammar book the particle O is placed after a noun to indicate that the noun is the direct object... :confused:
    Time, stai studiando il giapponese? Bravo ...

    It's generally explained that wa (は) is the subject marker and wo (を) the object marker, thus indicating which is subject and which is object.
     

    TimeHP

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Time, stai studiando il giapponese? Bravo ...
    Grazie, anzi Arigatoo! (Brava, in my case...)

    Ho scoperto che l'hiragana di Wo e O è lo stesso/I've discovered that Wo and O have the same hiragana sign:
    を)

    Hai, Watashi wa Nihongo o benkyo shiru, honno sukoshi hanasemasu...
    Ciao
     

    kikou

    Member
    Japan
    Ciao, TimeHP.:)

    La pronuncia di wo(を) e o(お) è la stessa.
    (を)と,(お)の発音は、同じです。
    (を)と,(お)のはつんは、なじです。
    (wo)to (o) no hatsuon wa onaji desu.

    Però
    (を)と、(お)のはつんは、なじです。 :arrow: è la frase( ortografia) sbagliata.
    (wo)to (o)no hatsuwon wa wonaji desu.

    Io parlo giapponese.
    私は、日本語を、話します
    watashi wa nihongo wo hanashimasu.
    ☆“il giapponese” è il complemento (oggetto) diretto del “parlo”

     ciao ciao.:)
     

    TimeHP

    Senior Member
    Italian - Italy
    Grazie mille, Kikou.
    Il tuo Italiano è sicuramente migliore del mio Giapponese.


    o (お) is not the same as wo (を)
    but wo often pronounced as o,
    Può dipendere dalla zona geografica? La mia insegnante è di Kyoto e mi
    sembra che pronunci sempre O.

    Ciao
     

    toscairn

    Banned
    Japan
    In text "o" (お) always appear in anywhere other than particles, and "wo" (を) as particle.
    In pronunciation, however, you may choose both ways.
    Because, they're regarded as the same phoneme as particle.
    As I've written in my previous message, more than half of Japanese pronounce it "o," and it's traditional.
    Increasing number of those who prefer the "wo" sound (especially heard among younger generations) is due to the "westernization" of Japanese sound system.
    For that reason I assume your teacher would be over forty. It's rather age than geographical reasons. Abito in Kyoto e pronuncio sempre "wo."
     

    kikou

    Member
    Japan
    toscairn said:
    In pronunciation, however, you may choose both ways.
    Because, they're regarded as the same phoneme as particle.
    As I've written in my previous message, more than half of Japanese pronounce it "o," and it's traditional.
    Increasing number of those who prefer the "wo" sound (especially heard among younger generations) is due to the "westernization" of Japanese sound system.
    For that reason I assume your teacher would be over forty. It's rather age than geographical reasons. Abito in Kyoto e pronuncio sempre "wo."
    こんにちは、toscairnさん。
    質問があります。
    当方、埼玉在住の20代ですが、「を」を、「ぅを」等と発音している人、見たことがありません。学校でもそのようには習いませんでしたが。「wo」の「w」は、“前歯で下唇を噛んで・・・”ってやつですか?もしかして。多くの日本人が、普通の「お」と、その「を」を聞き分けられるんでしょうか?私には聞き分けられませんし、そうも思いませんが。(「を」は、日常会話の殆どで省略されている場合が多いですが。)でも、矢張り、若い人達の間では、「ぅを」なんでしょうか?

    TimeHP said:
    Può dipendere dalla zona geografica? La mia insegnante è di Kyoto e mi
    sembra che pronunci sempre O.
    Ciao TimeHP, :)

    IO credo che la pronuncia di “wo” sia uguale a quella di “o” in tutto il Giappone. Inoltre non dipende dalla età. C'é semplicemente una differenza ortografica.

    Vivo vicino a Tokyo ed ancora non ho 30 anni, ma pronuncio “o” senza dubbio. Perché sono giapponese.:p

    Ciao.
     
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