I speak/know a little bit of Russian

Commanderawesome

Member
USA: English
Privyet!

If I were to say this, would it be (transliterated)


Ya govoryoo/znayu nemnogo paruski?

I think the nemnogo is wrong.. not sure though


Spasibo!
 
  • Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Hi. You've got it almost right. It should be: Я немного говорю по-русски (Ya n'emnoga gavar'u paruski).
    "Znayu" doesn't sound natural though people will understand you.
    "Знаю" sounds pretty natural, yet it asks for another wording: Я немного знаю русский язык.
    We've recently discussed this matter here.
     

    xuchong

    New Member
    English
    Quick question: немного is pronounced with a hard г, not "nemnovo", is that right? Also, I have heard something that sounds like: Я говорю "чын-чын" по-русски. What is that word; I'm pretty sure I spelt it wrong.
     

    Q-cumber

    Senior Member
    Quick question: немного is pronounced with a hard г, not "nemnovo", is that right? Also, I have heard something that sounds like: Я говорю "чын-чын" по-русски. What is that word; I'm pretty sure I spelt it wrong.
    I think you meant уть-чуть" <choot'-choot'> or чуточку <chootаchcoo> (both: adv., colloquial) - just a little, a little bit. Synonym: немного
     
    Last edited:

    Dalshe

    New Member
    English - United States
    Privyet!

    If I were to say this, would it be (transliterated)


    Ya govoryoo/znayu nemnogo paruski?

    I think the nemnogo is wrong.. not sure though


    Spasibo!
    The Nemnogo is correct, however, tranliterated the Equivalent for the Russian o is not pronounced as it would be when reading English. In Russian, it is more of a flat a sound like the a sound in the word assigned. I would transliterate this as Ya goveriu zniau neomnoga po Russki. The sentence translates to I speak think somewhat in Russian. I have no idea why whoever wrote this sentance included the word know. I took Russian language in college and have spent many years in the company of Russian speakers. When translitering, I think there is no correct way, just what makes the most sense depending on the sounds you are going for. So, Russians have more levels of measuring proficiency than just none, a little bit, intermediate or fluently. Nemnoga indicates a little bit more than a little bit. Chootchoot is a little bit, nemnoga is a little bit more. Cvobna is fluent. I was looking on this site trying to find all the levels of proficiency because I forgot the ones in between nemnoga and cvobna.
     
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