I try to run ... to keep me/myself interested

the1dsuniverse

Senior Member
Spanish
Hey guys! I came across this sentence "I try to run a three-mile race every other month to keep me interested in running" and I'm not sure whether it should be "me" or "myself". I've heard people say this before, like they'll say "I (verb) me" and it sounds weird to me, so I just want to know if the above sentence is correct.
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    I don't have any problem with "me" in that sentence. However, you can replace it with "myself" if "me" bothers you.
     

    Erebos12345

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi,

    In your example, I prefer myself, but hearing me wouldn't really bother me that much.

    I think there might be a slight difference in emphasis.
    I keep myself interested...
    Running (a three-mile race...) keeps me interested...

    Cross-posted.
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    You keep yourself interested.
    I try to run a three-mile race every other month to keep myself interested in running.

    I run a three-mile race every other month, which keeps me interested in running. (running a three-mile race every other month keeps you interested)
     

    the1dsuniverse

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    And if the distance between "I" and "myself" was longer, would you still suggest I use "myself"? For example:

    "I take the dog for a walk on a daily basis and try to run a three-mile race every other month to keep myself interested in running"
     

    VicNicSor

    Banned
    Russian
    It's not the distance that matters but rather the grammar: "(in order) to keep interested" is your purpose/intention. So the reflexive pronoun ("myself") is the better choice. But when the agent of the verb "keep" is something else ("running"), then it "keeps me interested".
     

    entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    VicNicSor is right: the subject 'I' is still the implied subject of the distant 'keep': I keep myself interested. There is a possible distance effect, because the longer the material in between, the more likely it is to include a different subject, so something keeps me interested. I don't think this is so in your specific example; it hasn't subtly switched to saying the race keeps me interested. But it can be understood that way, which is why 'me' doesn't sound completely wrong.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think that "motivated" is the word you would want to use.

    I try to enter at least one competition every three months to keep me motivated to continue to train.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top