I('ve) got it. [when there is a knock at the front door]

HSS

Senior Member
Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
You and your family are watching TV in the living room, and there is a ding-dong at the front door. You are willing to go see who's there and may talk to him/her as you open the door. What would you say to your family.

(1) I'll get it.
(2) I('ve) got it.

I would say (1), but you might say (2), might you not, since it could be interpreted as 'I've (already) taken the obligation/responsibility to answer it'?
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I would say "I'll get it" but I've definitely heard "I've got it" being used, possibly in American English.
    (That's as the speaker gets up, not when they have opened the door.)
     

    HSS

    Senior Member
    Standard Japanese, Sendaian Japanese
    Right, HG, when the speaker gets up. 'I've got it,' I think, is used when there are more than just one, yourself, who seem to gladly get up and walk to the door. As if to say 'It's me, I'm the first.'
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I see no difference in meaning at all between the two. The difference to me is only that I'd expect "I'll get it" on this side of the Atlantic Ocean - like Hermione.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    I would also expect someone in the UK to say “I’ll get it”, or maybe “I’ll get that, shall I?”. We do often say “I’ve got it”, but – in my experience – not normally in the context of answering the door.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think it would most likely be said in a situation where someone was naturally closer to the door and a group was farther away, say watching TV. So when the doorbell rings, the person not in the group and closer would call out to them, "I've got it." Then the group wouldn't have to interrupt what they were doing.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    A doorbell ring (or a telephone ring) requires someone to respond. If there are multiple people, one may ask another to respond:
    - Would someone get that?
    - Tony, will you get that?

    Someone may speak to the others, volunteering:
    - I'll get that.
    - I'll get it.

    In these sentence "get" means "respond to", and "it/that" means the ringing.

    ----------------------

    In AE, saying "I've got this" or "I've got it" means "I am handling this situation: nobody else needs to act." This phrase is used in many other situations where there is no immediate or urgent action required. For example.

    Ruth: Well, there are 6 of us. Someone needs to buy the soda and cookies.
    Tony: I've got that. I have a car.
    Ruth: Thanks, Tony. Next, who wants to decorate the gym?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    In AE, saying "I've got this" or "I've got it" means "I am handling this situation: nobody else needs to act."
    That meaning is not restricted to AE. But as Andy says, your example is not a typical BE use of it. In my experience, it’s used more to say I don’t need your help, thanks, I’ve got it – I can do this on my own.
     
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