I wait to hear from you

Gyurme

Member
USA
United States
Hello,
I want to end my email to a friend with the implication that I am waiting to hear back from her about a question that I posed in specific and in general as I have not heard from her in a while. In English I would tend to say: "I await your reply" or "I wait to hear from you". "fammi sapere" feels too curt and doesn't connote a more general sense to me. So the following are my stabs at a possible phrase:
Aspetto a sentirti...
Aspetto che tu risponda...
Aspetto la tua risposta...
Sto aspettando la tua risposta
Non vedo l'ora di sentirti...
Thank you.
 
  • Archbishop

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Hi,
    The first sentence is not correct, and in the second one, you could use a future form like: 'aspettero' una tua risposta'. If you are writing to a friend of yours, I guess you to use 'fammi sapere per favore o per piacere' because it sounds more polite to me.
    arch
     

    Gyurme

    Member
    USA
    United States
    Hi,
    I do not understand how "aspettero una tua risposta' works. Why "una" and not "alla"? Is it a colloquialism?
    Are you saying that it would be more polite and familiar to use "fammi sapere per favore" than "aspettero una tua risposta"?
    Grazie tante
    Gyurme
     

    RobertaP

    Member
    italian
    Hi,
    I do not understand how "aspettero una tua risposta' works. Why "una" and not "alla"? Is it a colloquialism?
    Are you saying that it would be more polite and familiar to use "fammi sapere per favore" than "aspettero una tua risposta"?
    Grazie tante
    Gyurme
    Hello Gyurme
    "aspetterò una tua risposta" is perfectly correct, but not really used. "Aspettare is a verbo transitivo therefore it asks for a complemento oggetto. "Alla tua risposta" is not correct.
    I'd say to a friend: "Fammi sapere per favore". It's totally fine.
    In a more formal email, you could say "In attesa di una tua/sua gentile risposta"

    Ciao
    Roberta
     

    Nicholas the Italian

    Senior Member
    Italian
    I do not understand how "aspettero una tua risposta' works. Why "una" and not "alla"? Is it a colloquialism?
    Aspetto + sostantivo
    oppure
    aspetto di + verbo infinito
    oppure
    aspetto che + verbo congiuntivo

    Aspetto una tua risposta
    Aspetto di ricevere una tua risposta
    Aspetto che tu mi risponda

    The first one is the one used in your context.
     

    Gyurme

    Member
    USA
    United States
    Thanks to all for the attention to my question.Thank you Nicholas for breaking it down for me.
    It has been explained that aspettare requires a direct object and it is one of those verbs that uses di before the infinitive that follows. The formulation of "una tua risposta" is still confusing to me though. In Pattyfashion's response she offered : "Aspetto tue notizie". So why not: Aspetto tua risposta or Aspetto la tua risposta. What's with the "una"? How is that grammatically correct?
     

    Nicholas the Italian

    Senior Member
    Italian
    In Pattyfashion's response she offered : "Aspetto tue notizie". So why not: Aspetto tua risposta or Aspetto la tua risposta. What's with the "una"? How is that grammatically correct?
    "Una" in place of "la" simply because you wait for "an" answer, not "the" answer.
    Why in plural you can omit the article, that's an interesting question, that I will leave to some grammar expert to answer.
    Just know that it's a general thing.

    "Posso chiederti un'informazione?" :tick:
    "Posso chiederti l'informazione?" :cross: (quale?)
    "Posso chiederti informazione?" :cross:

    "Posso chiederti delle informazioni?" :tick:
    "Posso chiederti le informazioni?" :cross: (quali?)
    "Posso chiederti informazioni?" :tick:
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    una tua risposta is like a response from you.

    tue notizie simply doesn't take an article; this has to be learned.
     

    Nicholas the Italian

    Senior Member
    Italian
    tue notizie simply doesn't take an article; this has to be learned.
    I wouldn't be so definitive. :)
    It's just that when you are generic, you often don't put the article.

    Ho inviato il curriculum a dodici aziende,
    aspetto le risposte => I wait for the answers, I expect everyone will respond.
    aspetto delle risposte => I wait for some answers, not sure how many.
    aspetto risposte => I generically wait for answers (may or may not come, in any number, kind or shape).

    I can't explain any better but it's a more general thing, "tue notizie" has nothing special. Except that when closing letters the most used form is the generic "aspetto tue notizie", "resto in attesa di tue notizie".

    Aspetto le tue notizie => it's like I've sent you to gather news, and I expect you to report back.
     

    brian

    Senior Member
    AmE (New Orleans)
    But I think you proved my point.

    When tue notizie means news about you, what you've been doing, how your life is going, etc.--that is, general things regarding you--then you don't use the article.

    When it means specific news or things that both of you know about, then you use the article, but this is much less common, I feel.

    Aspetto le tue notizie, dammi le tue notizie, etc. are common phrases used all the time. That's why I said it just has to be learned, just like any other expression.
     
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