I want the world to share in castle walls

Kolridg

Senior Member
Russian
Don McLean - Castles In The Air Lyrics | AZLyrics.com
And if she asks you why you can tell her that I told you
That I'm tired of Castles in the Air
I've got a dream I want the world to share in castle walls
Just leave me to despair
I have no idea what "I want the world to share in castle walls" could mean. If I read it literally it means "I want the world to divide into parts in the castle", but it doesn't make any sense.

Maybe right words order is the next one: "I want to share the world in castle walls". Then it means that he wants to share the whole world with a woman that he hopes he will meet in the castle? So, it must be lyrics is written so in order to match the rhyme or anything else, but actually we should take it in a bit other way as I suggested?

I have specially listened to this part of the song once again counting on finding a typo in the lyrics quoted from the internet, but it still has proved to be exactly the same as lyrics in the original song.
 
  • Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    Of course, in case it needs to be pointed out, there is a relative clause here.
    "I've got a dream that I want the world to share" = "I have a dream that I want to share with the world".
    The relative pronoun "that" is very often omitted (but understood) in constructions like this.
     

    Kolridg

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Noted, and thanks.

    I jumped to conclusions saying that I understood the explanations. One detail is still not clear.

    Of course, in case it needs to be pointed out, there is a relative clause here.
    "I've got a dream that I want the world to share" = "I have a dream that I want to share with the world".
    The relative pronoun "that" is very often omitted (but understood) in constructions like this.
    But isn't preposition "with" is omitted as well in the original text? I think so because if it is not omitted then he wants the world to share rather than he wants to share. Is it normal to say "I want the world to share something with me" while I mean that it is me who wants to share with world?

    As far as I can see, there are different senses in these two phrases. But I guess unusual phrase is still used (the one that is without "with"), but we upset the sense in view of previous words say: "I have a dream". Based on this, if I have a dream, it's me who is to share, even if it is literally said that world is.
     

    Chasint

    Senior Member
    English - England
    "I've got a dream that I want the world to share" = "I have a dream that I want to share with the world".
    I beg to differ with that equivalence. In fact it should be.

    "I've got a dream that I want the world to share" = "I have a dream that I want the world to share with me."

    There is a peculiarity about the word share - it is not always directional. If I share something with you then the result is that we both share it.

    If I share something with the world then both I and the world now share it between us. And the world shares it with me.

    The point is that there are two meanings.

    (1) to share means to give part of what you own to someone else
    (2) to share means to have a split ownership of something with someone else

    It's a tricky concept and I don't know if I have explained it sufficiently.
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I don't think it matters much from which direction you view it.
    What is clear is that the speaker (singer) has a dream. Therefore it is his dream, but he wants it to be "the world's and his". You can express this either by saying that he wants to share it with the world or that he wants the world to share it with him. My instinct would be to favour the former, in which "sharing" is what the giver does: Will you share your lottery winnings with your friends? and not what the taker does: Will your friends share your lottery winnings with you? Either way, the end result will be the same (if the answer to the question is "yes"), namely that giver and takers will share the winnings (and here we would usually omit the prepositional phrase "with each other").
     
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