I want to be the first to take the bike for a ride around the city

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
There were three friends living together in a house. One day, they bought a bike with the money they have been saving for a long time.
After they bought the bike. They started arguing over who is going to ride the bike first. When no consensus was reached.
They had a toss to decide who is going to ride the bike first.

" I want to be the first to take the bike for a ride around the city" they argued . This construction sounds total nonsense to me, And I confess this nonsense is my work.

Now how can I make it grammatically correct?
 
  • jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    This looks grammatically correct to me but sounds slightly awkward. It doesn't sound like spoken English. I guess I'd say, "I want the first ride." without adding a lot of unnecessary words like "take the bike" or "around the city".
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    This looks grammatically correct to me but sounds slightly awkward. It doesn't sound like spoken English. I guess I'd say, "I want the first ride." without adding a lot of unnecessary words like "take the bike" or "around the city".
    Take the bike for a ride? I thought If you take someone for a ride it means you fool that person.
    So believing your words, Could I say? I want take this Car for a drive. How would you say that?
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I want to take the car for a drive. :tick:

    ("...," they argued. says they all said exactly the same thing. That's unusual. ;))
     

    jmichaelm

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If your friend was going somewhere and you come along just for fun then you could say, "I went for a ride." meaning you went for no purpose other than just to make the trip and to spend time with a friend. Your friend could ask you to come along for no special reason except to be together by saying, "Come with me. I'll take you for a ride." Neither of these examples has any metaphorical meaning. They literally mean you will go for a ride.

    However, if you planned to accomplish something important and you depended on someone to help you get it done, but instead all they did is waste your time and possibly take your money, then you might use the metaphorical meaning of "taken for a ride." "I hired a landscaper for my home, but the guy really took me for a ride."
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    I want to take the car for a drive. :tick:

    ("...," they argued. says they all said exactly the same thing. That's unusual. ;))
    What's unusual about it. If you don't explain that to me I will put a heavier leaf over you .:D

    So I can say I can take a bike or car for a ride/drive without fooling anyone.
     
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