I want to eat bananas now.

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Wanbicoi

Senior Member
Vietnam
Thanks for reading my post.


Sample sentences:
I want to eat bananas now
Question:

Does this sentence mean I want to eat 'more than one banana' as plural objects or I want to eat 'a kind of fruit named bananas' as generalizations?

Thanks a lot for any comments, corrections or suggestions
 
  • tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    Apart from the fact that forum rules require you to give context, there is the point that "I want to eat bananas [or any other fruit] now" is not a very natural sentence in English. Indeed, "I want to eat [anything]" is natural only in some contexts.
     

    Wanbicoi

    Senior Member
    Vietnam
    Apart from the fact that forum rules require you to give context, there is the point that "I want to eat bananas [or any other fruit] now" is not a very natural sentence in English. Indeed, "I want to eat [anything]" is natural only in some contexts.
    thanks for your corrections. How about I change the sentence into 'I want bananas'?
     

    tunaafi

    Senior Member
    English - British (Southern England)
    "I want bananas" is a grammatically correct English sentence. There are a limited number of situations it which it could be uttered naturally.
     

    Wanbicoi

    Senior Member
    Vietnam
    "I want bananas" is a grammatically correct English sentence. There are a limited number of situations it which it could be uttered naturally.
    Thanks for your opinion. 'i want bananas' with 'bananas' as a generalization is grammatically correct but semantically unnatural, so I think I should use 'I want a banana/some bananas' for whatever reasons.
     

    Wanbicoi

    Senior Member
    Vietnam
    Please give us some context. What situation do you have in mind in which you might say 'I want a/some/bananas'?
    Actually I don't have any in mind. I'm trying to figure out whether 'bananas' in 'I want bananas' can be a generic noun which represents a whole class of things. But now I realize as Tunnafi said, there's not many real life situations where we can use the sentence to make generalizations. So I think I just skip it. Could you think of any situations?
     

    Ponyprof

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Usually we don't eat generalizations.

    But obviously in statements like the following we refer to bananas in general;

    Bananas are the most popular fruit in the USA.

    Bananas are the cheapest fruit in the USA.

    The price of bananas is increasing next month
     

    Wanbicoi

    Senior Member
    Vietnam
    Usually we don't eat generalizations.

    But obviously in statements like the following we refer to bananas in general;

    Bananas are the most popular fruit in the USA.

    Bananas are the cheapest fruit in the USA.

    The price of bananas is increasing next month
    Thanks for your answers. If we don't eat generalizations, can we sell them? like my shop sells bananas
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I want to eat (some) bananas now.

    I might not use "some", but it would depend on the context. "Bananas" does perhaps sound more general, and it's more difficult for me to imagine a context.

    Strawberries? No, I feel like eating bananas right now; lots and lots of them.
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    The lack of context for the original sentence has led the discussion to wander, so I am closing the thread. Thank you to all who participated.

    Florentia52, moderator
     
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