I was a last-minute crammer in university

supermarioutd

Senior Member
Persian
Hello to all,

I want to say that when I was in university I didn't study during the term and I always studied the night before the exam. Does this work and how natural is it? :

I was always a last-minute crammer in university.

Is the sentence complete and do I need to explain a bit more to make the meaning clear?

Is there a more common idiom to describe a person like that?
 
  • handsomechuck

    Senior Member
    American English (NYC region)
    "all nighter" is a common one in AE, usually with verb "pull," as in "I pulled a lot of all-nighters in college."
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    "all nighter" is a common one in AE, usually with verb "pull," as in "I pulled a lot of all-nighters in college."
    Thanks. But can I say it to suggest it was my habit to always study last-minute?

    This doesn't feel natural to me: I was an all-nighter kind of a student
     

    handsomechuck

    Senior Member
    American English (NYC region)
    You can pick a modifier

    I routinely pulled all-nighters in college.
    I regularly pulled all-nighters in college.
    I always pulled all-nighters in college.
    I habitually pulled all-nighters in college. ("habitually" sounds more formal)

    Or you could just say

    I was a crammer in college.

    That's understood to mean that cramming was defining or habitual for you.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    You can pick a modifier

    I routinely pulled all-nighters in college.
    I regularly pulled all-nighters in college.
    I always pulled all-nighters in college.
    I habitually pulled all-nighters in college. ("habitually" sounds more formal)

    Or you could just say

    I was a crammer in college.

    That's understood to mean that cramming was defining or habitual for you.
    Thanks. This is my favorite:

    I was a crammer in college.
     

    supermarioutd

    Senior Member
    Persian
    A crammer is a school, teacher, or book which prepares students for an exam by teaching them a lot in a short time. [BRIT]

    Maybe crammer makes sense in American?

    What do Brits say to refer to someone who studies a short time before the exam?
     

    User With No Name

    Senior Member
    English (U.S.)
    Have you ever heard it?
    I can't recall ever hearing that exact phrase. However, I don't remember every sentence I've ever heard.

    It follows a pattern that is easily understood and would be logical to most speakers, I think.
    I partied a lot in college. I was a partier.
    I joined a lot of organizations. I was a joiner.
    I crammed a lot. I was a crammer.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I don't know whether there's any special term in BE. I would say He always leaves his revision till the last minute.
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I don't know whether there's any special term in BE. I would say He always leaves his revision till the last minute.
    No, I don't really think there is, either.

    Something like "I was always a crammer at exam-time" would probably be understood from the context, but I don't recall ever actually having heard anyone use it.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    We say things like 'I always mugged up just before the exams', and I am aware that Americans will not understand this!
    mug2
    VERB
    [WITH OBJECT]mug something up
    British
    informal

    • Learn or revise a subject as far as possible in a short time.
      ‘I'm constantly having to mug up things ahead of teaching them’
      no object ‘we had mugged up on all things Venetian before the start of the course’
    mug | Definition of mug in English by Oxford Dictionaries
     
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