I was bought a car.

everestdude

Senior Member
hindi
Good morning,

A: I was bought a car.
B: A car was bought for me.

Are these passive sentences grammatically correct? The reason I asked is because I rarely hear them so I was wondering if they are correct.
 
  • entangledbank

    Senior Member
    English - South-East England
    The simplest passive of sentence A uses 'by': A car was bought by me. But we very rarely say this, with a personal pronoun (like 'me') as agent. If you say 'for me', that's different. I didn't buy the car, someone else bought the car for me. But it is still unlikely; we're more likely to use the double object construction in the active: My parents bought me a car.
     

    SevenDays

    Senior Member
    Spanish
    Good morning,

    A: I was bought a car.
    B: A car was bought for me.

    Are these passive sentences grammatically correct? The reason I asked is because I rarely hear them so I was wondering if they are correct.
    A car was bought by me is the passive of A.

    It's grammatically correct, but it's no wonder you rarely hear it. Passive means "demoting" the subject, making it less prominent in the sentence. It's a bit odd for the speaker to "demote" himself that way.
     

    everestdude

    Senior Member
    hindi
    Sentence A is a passive sentence itself.

    1: she bought me a car.

    2: I was bought a car by her.

    Isn’t sentence 2 a passive form of sentence 1?
     

    Aguas Claras

    Senior Member
    UK English
    "I was bought a car" and "A car was bought for me" are both gramatically correct and mean the same thing. But, it is highly unlikely that you would say that somebody had bought you a car without saying who it was, so the sentences sound strange. So, as people have pointed out, you would be more likely to say "My parents bought me a car".

    More likely examples along the same lines might be: "We were given programmes at the theatre door" or "Programmes were given to us at the theatre door".
     
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